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Funding

BOILERPLATE TEXT FOR GRANT APPLICATIONS

This page contains boilerplate text for the Facilities and Resources sections of NIH grant applications

CTSI and CTSI partner institutions

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is known internationally for providing high-quality, patient–centered care and developing innovative approaches to healthcare delivery and treatment. Clinical programs range from primary care to specialized treatments for rare, complex and advanced illnesses. Many of our research innovations, such as the potential use of stem cells to cure disease or the replacement of damaged heart valves without open-heart surgery, may dramatically reduce risk to patients while also reducing the cost of care. Cedars-Sinai is one of the largest independent academic medical centers in the United States, serving the diverse Los Angeles community with 886 licensed beds, 2,100 physicians in every clinical specialty, 2,800 nurses, and thousands of other healthcare professionals, staff and volunteers. In FY14 Cedars-Sinai had 45,344 admissions, 85,082 emergency visits, with a total of 180,916 patients cared for within the Cedars-Sinai medical network.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science

Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU) is a premier mission-driven university dedicated to transforming the lives of underserved communities through health professions education, biomedical research and compassionate patient care. Since the school was incorporated in 1966 out of the ashes of the Watts Riots, it has been serving South Los Angeles and beyond by working to eliminate health disparities and providing unique, quality education and training opportunities. CDU has earned designation as a minority-serving institution by the U.S. Office for Civil Rights, and is recognized by the Department of Education under Title III B as a Historically Black Graduate Institution. The University is also a charter member of the Hispanic-Serving Health Professions Schools. CDU has graduated more than 550 medical doctors, 2,500 post-graduate physicians, more than 2,000 physician assistants and hundreds of other health professionals and leaders ready to provide care in today's workforce with excellence and compassion. CDU is located within the Watts/Willowbrook area of Los Angeles County’s Service Planning Area (SPA) 6 — one of the most ethnically diverse and socio-economically deprived regions of the country..

Last updated September 1, 2016

Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

Investigators at the Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute routinely conduct between 650 and 1,000 research studies in areas encompassing emerging infections, cancer, women’s health, male reproductive health, pulmonary rehabilitation, neonatology, autoimmune diseases, cardiology, neurosurgery, health services and outcomes as well as genomics/personalized medicine. The 100+ entrepreneurial physician-scientists at Harbor-LA BioMed have made major contributions to the advancement of medicine, through discoveries that have been translated, through LA BioMed’s active technology transfer program, into novel paradigms, diagnostics, devices and therapies. Paradigms include the conception and development of the first training programs for paramedics as well as nurse practitioners. Diagnostics were developed that led to the currently used test for serum cholesterol, the newborn thyroid deficiency screening test now used nationwide for every newborn, and screening procedure for Tay-Sachs disease that dramatically diminished the incidence rates worldwide. Therapies include a genetically engineered enzyme replacement for mucopolysaccharoidosis, injections to dissolve submandibular fat, an inexpensive treatment for sickle cell anemia and a vaccine to combat nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections currently in phase II trials. Pioneering devices include a variety of stents to treat aortic aneurysms and a number of pediatric cardiac monitoring devices including one to give early warning signs to parents of an imminent SIDS event. LA BioMed is organized in an interdisciplinary fashion with specific centers and institutes including Genomics and Molecular Epidemiology, Infection and Immunity, Center for Pulmonary Hypertension Research, and the Male Reproductive Center—both a World Health Organization-collaborating center for research in reproduction as well as an NICHD-funded contraceptive clinical trial network center. LA BioMed operates on its own 11.5-acre research park on the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (HUMC) Campus, and as a result has extensive interactions with HUMC medical staff and the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services.

The Harbor-UCLA Medical Center draws on a catchment area of about 3 million residents, 550,000 of which are below the poverty level. The hospital is the cornerstone of healthcare services for more than 700,000 residents in the greater South Bay providing high quality healthcare to every patient regardless of ability to pay. It has over 300 full-time faculty members (with academic appointments the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA) and 500 trainees. HUMC is actively involved in teaching 50% of all UCLA medical students.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA-Westwood

UCLA is the second-oldest campus of the UC system. It offers 353 undergraduate and graduate degree programs in a wide range of disciplines. With an approximate enrollment of 29,000 undergraduate and 12,000 graduate students, UCLA has the largest enrollment in the UC system and is the most applied to university in the world with over 112,000 applications for fall 2015. 

The university is organized into five undergraduate colleges, seven professional schools, and four professional health science schools. Thirteen Nobel laureates (six professors and seven alumni) have been affiliated with the university as faculty, researchers, or alumni. Among the current faculty, 51 are members of the National Academy of Science; 26, the National Academy of Engineering; 41, the Institute of medicine; and 132, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Three professors have won Pulitzer Prizes for general non-fiction or history.

In 2015, UCLA ranked 12th in overall global rankings and 13th for reputation in the Times Higher Education World University Rankings. 

In U.S. rankings in 2015, US News & World report ranked UCLA second among public universities (tied with the University of Virginia) and 23rd among national universities (again tied with University of Virginia). UCLA took the 8th spot among all universities for research spending in the sciences and engineering during the fiscal year 2012, according to a 2013 report by the National Science Foundation, the last year for which data is available. In FY14, UCLA ranked 11th in NIH funding, with 829 awards totaling $364,307,752. 

In the 2015 edition US News & World Report, UCLA Medical Center was ranked “Best in the West” for the 26th consecutive year. It was also ranked 3rd in the Nation (tied with Johns Hopkins) in "Best Hospitals". UCLA Medical Center was also in the top 3% of institutions who were ranked as top in the nation in specialties including 15 adult specialties (Cancer, Cardiology & Heart Surgery, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Ear, Nose & Throat, Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Nephrology, Neurology & Neurosurgery, Ophthalmology, Orthopedics, Psychiatry, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, and Urology) and 9 pediatric specialties (Cancer, Cardiology & Heart Surgery, Diabetes & Endocrinology, Gastroenterology & GI Surgery, Neonatology, Nephrology, Neurology & Neurosurgery, Orthopedics, and Urology).

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA CTSI

The UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) is a research partnership of UCLA, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science and the Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor UCLA Medical Center. Its mission is to bring biomedical innovations to bear on the greatest health needs of Los Angeles—the largest and one of the most ethnically, socially and economically diverse counties in the United States. Its vision is to catalyze research that translates discoveries into tangible improvements in health care, and disease prevention and treatment in Los Angeles County. The UCLA CTSI is one of more than 60 research “hubs” supported by the Clinical and Translational Sciences Award (CTSA) program of National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS).

Last updated September 1, 2016

Clinical and Translational Research Centers

Cedars-Sinai Clinical & Translational Research Center (CTRC)

The Cedars-Sinai Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTRC) is designed to serve the needs of clinical research in a variety of settings, both inpatient and outpatient. The CTRC at Cedars serves investigators from a 2,250 square foot base of operation which provides clinical support services in a five room outpatient facility located in the South Tower of the Medical Center on Gracie Allen Drive in Los Angeles. Additional facilities include a processing lab and consult room.

Each of our rooms offers subjects a comfortable reclining lounger or an exam table. Each room is equipped with flat screen TVs and DVD players to help subjects relax through long procedures, while receiving excellent care delivered by highly skilled certified research nurses.

One of our unique features is our mobility, allowing support of research activity in the field. Such “field” services include providing support in CSMC clinics, surgical units or inpatient units, and assisting with data or specimen collection from patients and their family members. We also have a Research Subject Advocate who oversees research and data safety issues in close collaboration with the clinical investigators who utilize the CTRC.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Charles R. Drew University Clinical & Translational Research Center (CTRC)

The Charles R. Drew University Clinical and Translational Research Center (CDU-CTRC) is located in a 5,000 square foot outpatient and administrative unit with seven exam/treatment rooms, a processing laboratory and a dedicated consultation space for study participant interviews. We provide cardiovascular and metabolic assessment resources, a site dedicated pharmacist, negotiated lab fees for assays, and participant transportation. Our site also offers Wi-Fi and a conference room capable of state of the art collaborative meetings for community partners and collaborators. In addition to our CTRC unit, the University offers additional conference room spaces and houses both Morphometry and Core Laboratories. 

Our CTRC clinical staff is knowledgeable and skilled in protocol implementation, data collection, phlebotomy, IV insertions, pharmacokinetic studies, administration of investigational drugs, multiple sample collection, Oral Glucose Tolerance Tests, glucose clamp studies, EKGs, and assisting investigators with minor bedside procedures. Pharmacy services include procurement, disposal, packaging, randomization and dispensing. Currently CTRC services seven actively recruiting studies in the areas of HIV/AIDS, Cancer, Social/ Behavioral and Cardio-metabolic Research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center (CTRC)

The UCLA-Clinical and Translational Research Center (UCLA-CTRC) at LA BioMed is located at the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Los Angeles BioMedical Research Institute and provides clinical support services with four exam rooms, five overnight stay rooms, two consult/interview rooms, one sleep lab with monitoring equipment, two multipurpose rooms (includes beds, infusion chairs, a phlebotomy area, retinal eye camera and pQCT), a sample processing lab, research kitchen, nutritional classroom, DXA, indirect calorimeter and small conference room. The CTRC provides support and resources for studies on human research participants. The CTRC also provides consultation and support in biostatistics, study design, data management, and biomedical informatics and supports community engagement and research. In addition the CTRC supports a large number of Translational Research Cores.

All protocols requesting use of CTSI resources are independently reviewed for scientific merit, research participant safety, valid justification for resource utilization by the UCLA-CTSI Scientific Advisory Committee at LA BioMed/Harbor-UCLA, the Human Subjects Committee or the Institution Animal Use and Care Committee as appropriate, and the Research Committee. All protocols must be approved at all three levels before use of the UCLA-CTSI resources are possible.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA-Westwood Clinical & Translational Research Center (CTRC)

The UCLA-Westwood Clinical and Translational Research Center has 14 exam rooms, 2 private procedure suites, 1 scatter specialty unit and 2 infusion rooms with 2 infusion bays per room and an infusion bed where a subject can lie flat if needed during the infusion process. There are 2 consult rooms that are ideal for interviews and questionnaires. Eight rooms are equipped and wired for sleep studies. This unit has the capacity to be open 23 hours per day, Monday to Friday. The outpatient unit is staffed with highly specialized RNs.

The inpatient unit is a 3-bed inpatient unit housed in the state of the art Ronald Reagan Hospital at UCLA. This unit is open 24/7. In this setting, inpatients can be admitted for study and cared for by a staff of highly skilled RN’s while surrounded by the amenities and necessities of a first class, world-renowned research and teaching hospital.

Last updated October 25, 2016

CTSI program areas

Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Program

The Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design Program provides integrated services and biostatistical support. Services include contemporary data analysis methodology consultation, implementation, and epidemiology expertise; the best available clinical data management software; study design and grant preparation assistance; and bioinformatics/computational biology data analysis.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Community Engagement in Research Program

The Community Engagement in Research Program develops, implements, and refines models of community engagement and community capacity building, and facilitates research collaborations between academics and community partners. This includes designing and developing new models of engagement with public and private health systems; advancing the use of local health and social data by community stakeholders; and expanding patient and community participation in a broad range of scholarly activities and studying the impact of this enhanced participation on translational research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Informatics Program

The Informatics Program provides access to electronic health record (EHR) data across multiple institutions, builds computation resources for data management, analysis and sharing and formulates and implements coordinated plans for providing data security. A data consulting service helps researchers access UCLA clinical data, enabling cohort search in two federated networks involving the five UC Medical Centers (University of California Research Exchange) and the six LA-area medical centers Los Angeles Data Resource). The program also provides the following biomedical informatics training: an ACGME-accredited clinical informatics fellowship program, graduate-level training in biomedical informatics, and introductory researcher workshops for instruction in various informatics tools and standards.

Go to the Research Tools category on this page to view boilerplates for all the Informatics Program clinical data request tools. These include: i2b2, LADR, REDCap, UC ReX and xDR.  

Last updated September 1, 2016

Integrating Special Populations

The Integrating Special Populations Program (ISP) focuses on three special groups: children, older adults, and groups affected by health disparities. The program prioritizes these groups because of their poor health status in Los Angeles and nationally, the implications of their health for society including costs of care, and the emerging science of how life develops over the life course. ISP catalyzes and strengthens research in special populations by: attempting to increase the number of investigators studying special populations, by offering advice on study design and intense mentoring to improve the quality of research, and through thoughtful recruitment/retention activities.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Network Resources

The Network Resources Program consists of two units. The Clinical Research Acceleration Unit interacts with the CTSA Network Trial Innovation Centers (TICs) to ensure rapid study start-up of clinical trials and assists investigators with high priority studies that need rapid response with all aspects of pre-launch study management. Additional clinical trial infrastructure includes Reliance Mechanisms for IRB, Contracting, and Coverage Analysis, an integrated clinical research infrastructure platform, and participation in additional activities led by the TICs, such as national stakeholder engagement in driving policy changes to advance research innovation. The Recruitment Unit has also been established to interact with the Research Innovation Centers (RICs) to ensure rapid subject recruitment to clinical trials. The unit specifically supports cohort size estimation and site-level recruitment planning based on EHR data, assists with the design of recruitment messages and recruitment message delivery approaches, recruits potential research participants through outreach and/or point-of-care recruitment, and participates in additional activities led by the RICs, such as trials of alternative recruitment tools or national stakeholder engagement in driving policy changes to advance research recruitment.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Participant and Clinical Interactions

The Participant and Clinical Interactions (PCI) Program plays a critical role in assuring that clinical research at the UCLA CTSI partner institutions—Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles Biomedical Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, and UCLA—is performed safely, efficiently and reliably. The PCI offers a research-friendly environment that provides investigators and research staff with the training and support required to design and successfully complete studies capable of testing well-conceived research hypotheses. PCI certifies the competency and credentialing of research teams, holds rigorous scientific peer reviews and measures and share elements of a study’s successes and failures. 

The PCI program also mentors and oversees role-based clinical education and assists in collecting data analytics in order to assess research staff performance. PCI  maintains an equitable service voucher system and pilot initiatives to streamline, speed and avoid common research roadblocks.

As part of PCI, the Clinical and Translational Research Centers (CTRCs) support and supervise human studies and clinical trials conducted at each partner institution. CTRCs also assist with training junior investigators in the conduct of translational clinical research. Additional CTRC resources and services include: private beds, procedure suites, infusion room and bay, rooms equipped for sleep studies, a spinal cord injury center, interview rooms, inpatient unit, bionutrition services, and skilled RN and medical assistant staff.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Pilot, Translational and Clinical Studies

The Pilot, Translational and Clinical Studies Program provides seed funding for collaborative research, team-building activities and development of novel technologies and approaches. The program administers the following competitive mechanisms: Team Science Awards (up to $200,000) to enable multidisciplinary teams to develop preliminary data for extramural funding for high-impact translational research; Catalyst Grants (up to $5,000) to support team-building activities, including seminars; symposia; meetings related to a specific disease or scientific problem to stimulate team formation; Core  Vouchers (up to $10,000 in institutional funds) defray the cost of core services at the CTSI partner sites for feasible, translational and unique research addressing health problems.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Population Health

The Population Health program equips health agencies with the skills that they need to introduce and sustain the practice and application of critical translational science methods. The program focuses on preparing researchers and health agencies to: apply dissemination, implementation and improvement (DII) research methods to the development, scale-up and spread of multi-component, multi-level population health interventions; apply innovative modeling techniques and use large datasets for population health research and improvement; and apply DII sciences to address real-world population health problems. 

Last updated September 1, 2016

Precision Medicine

The Precision Medicine Program develops the necessary processes and infrastructure to bring genomic information into the clinical realm. It mobilizes and integrates genomic data with clinical data for translational research that involves genetics, genomics, patient phenotypes, and biomaterials.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Regulatory Knowledge and Support

The Regulatory Knowledge and Support Program ensures that our research is in full regulatory compliance and meets the highest quality assurance standards. The program is developing a regulatory knowledge portal on the CTSI website as well as navigation and pre-study regulatory support services. Regulatory also offers ethics counseling and research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Team Science

The Team Science Program augments the translational mission by continuing to develop new theoretical and evidence-based tools to improve, assess, and evaluate the capacity of interdisciplinary and translational science teams to effectively combine team members’ diverse expertise. The program specifically conducts research to understand the characteristics of high-performing teams. The impact of differences among team members in experience, background, culture, and disciplines are being studied. Program leaders adapt their training for academic community teams to provide novel training in communication and collaboration. To facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration, the UCLA CTSI has redesigned the Pilot Translational & Clinical Studies Program to exclusively support team science.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Workforce Development

The Workforce Development Program houses most of the CTSI education and training activities. It ensures CTSI trainees acquire the core competencies needed to conduct multidisciplinary research and to integrate community priorities and input into research across the T1 to T4 spectrum. The Program emphasizes three key areas: training and consultation in entrepreneurship and the product commercialization process; informatics training for investigators and faculty at all levels of experience; and training and certification in good clinical practices for all research staff. 

The program offers the CTSI Training Program in Translational Science (TPTS) to scientists and trainees at all CTSI partner institutions and from multiple professional schools (Medicine, Nursing, Public Health, Education and Informational Science, Public Policy). TPTS provides three levels of training: enrichment seminars that do not lead to a certificate or degree (Track 1); the two-year Translational Science Certificate program (Track 2); and the Master of Science in Clinical Research (Track 3).

The program integrates with the CTSI KL2 training program for junior faculty and the CTSI TL1 training programs for pre-doctoral students and health professional students. This is accomplished through externships in industry, government and the not-for-profit health sectors as well as lectures and coursework offered by the CTSI Training Program in Translational Science. 

The Workforce Development Program interacts closely with the CTSI Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Research Design (BERD) Program, the CTSI Team Science Program, and the CTSI Community Engagement and Research Program, each of which offer separate education and training activities.

Last updated September 1, 2016

CTSI-supported collaborations and initiatives

Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative

In 2014 the NIH funded 10 BUILD awards to minority-serving institutions (MSIs) and similar teaching-intensive institutions with high levels of low-income students with limited previous NIH funding. The BUILD awards support the design and implementation of innovative programs, strategies and approaches to transform undergraduate research training and mentorship. Beyond traditional factors that are emerging as predictors of student success in science, the BUILD program is unique in that their interventions are grounded in specific theories that address issues of diversity and root causes of disparities in the biomedical workforce such as racial stigmas, critical race theory, implicit bias, and stereotype threat. They also include infrastructure development, partnerships with pipeline and research campuses, faculty development, student development, and biomedical training and mentorship. The support given to BUILD institutions is designed to directly impact undergraduate students and faculty as well as institutional elements (e.g. student recruitment, research training opportunities, faculty tenure and promotion, curriculum development, etc.) in biomedical disciplines. The programs will promote culture change in the fields of biomedical education and training. Institutions funded through the BUILD initiative are required to partner with other academic institutions as well as the biomedical industry to provide a wealth of diverse training opportunities for their students. The NIH Diversity Program Consortium Coordination and Evaluation Center provides operations and data coordination and support, and conducts longitudinal evaluation, in support of BUILD.

Last updated September 1, 2016

CTSI Online Grant Library

The CTSI Online Grants Library, available through CTSI’s Team Science System, is an online resource for faculty and trainees at the four UCLA CTSI Institutions. Principal investigators of successfully funded grants have contributed their grant proposals to the CTSI for online sharing. This secure web-based platform allows trainees to view the grant proposals online, but also prevents users from copying, downloading or sharing the proposals outside of the platform. Thus, principal investigators can provide their successful grant knowing that their proposal will not be disseminated further without their permission. Still, the online grant library is a fully searchable tool and allows users to quickly access different aspects or sections of a grant proposal. The library was initiated in 2015, currently has 37 proposals, and is actively growing. It has 70 active users so far. The successful grants library is an important resource for junior faculty and other trainees in writing their first K or R grant. KL2 Scholars who are successful in obtaining extramural support will be asked to submit their proposals to the successful grants library.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Director’s Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-funded Workforce Program (Diversity Program)

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-funded Workforce Program (also called the Diversity Program) was established in FY 2014 in response to recommendations provided by the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD) Working Group on Diversity in the Biomedical Research Workforce. The award is for five years and the program distributed $31.3M in FY2014 with similar levels of distribution anticipated each year. The ACD report confirmed earlier reports indicating that underrepresented minority (URM) students and faculty face multiple disadvantages that contribute to the probability of having a successful research career, including lower numbers of grant submissions and lower funding success for applications that are submitted. Recommendations from this report included increases and enhancement of research training opportunities and environments as a means of achieving the nation’s goal of increased diversity in the biomedical and health professional workforce as a key strategy for improving the health of the nation. An important initial step was the genesis of the FOAs for the NIH Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative (RFA-RM-13-016), National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) (RFA-RM-13-017) and the Coordination and Evaluation Center for Enhancing the Diversity of the NIH-Funded Workforce Program (CEC) (RFA-RM-13-015). The Coordination and Evaluation Center was awarded to UCLA in 2014 and is integrated into the CTSI Community Engagement and Research, Education and Biomedical Informatics Programs.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Healthy Elderly Longevity Cohort (Wellderly)

The older population (age > 65 years) in 2030 is projected to be twice as large as in 2000 representing nearly 20 percent of the total US population. The first baby boomers turn 65 in 2011 and will challenge all facets of health care in the coming decades. The demographic changes underscore the need to understand the mechanisms that promote health and disease in this cohort. Genomic discoveries will help individuals and may reduce medical costs and benefit society. The objective of the Healthy Elderly Longevity Cohort (Wellderly) study is to obtain blood and/or saliva samples in order to help model health and disease phenotypes through population genomics. The blood and/or saliva samples may allow for participants' entire genomes to be sequenced if such comprehensive analysis becomes feasible and economical.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Jackson Heart Study

Since there is a greater prevalence of cardiovascular disease among African Americans, the purpose of the Jackson Heart Study (JHS) is to explore the reasons for this disparity and to uncover new approaches to reduce it. The JHS is a large, community-based, observational study whose 5301 participants were recruited from among the non-institutionalized African-American adults from urban and rural areas of the three counties (Hinds, Madison, and Rankin) that make up the Jackson, MS, metropolitan statistical area (MSA). Jackson is the capital of Mississippi, the state with the largest percentage (36.3%) of African Americans in the United States.

Last updated September 1, 2016

National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN)

Complementing the BUILD awards that focus on training of undergraduates, the National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) award supports a nationwide consortium of institutions to enhance mentoring and career development opportunities and training as a further element in the Diversity Consortium’s efforts to provide training and career development of individuals from diverse backgrounds. NRMN will provide mentorship and networking development support to those who are at all career levels, from undergraduate through junior faculty, and who are pursuing biomedical, behavioral, clinical, and social science research careers (collectively termed biomedical research careers).

Last updated September 1, 2016

Project Students Training in Researching Involving Disparity Elimination (STRIDE)

In response to the critical shortage of minorities in biomedical research and the health professions, the overarching goal of Project Students Training in Researching Involving Disparity Elimination (STRIDE) is to increase the number of underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students in the pipeline who are committed to research careers in the health sciences. Increasing the nation’s cadre of minority clinicians and researchers is a crucial component to eliminating health disparities, especially given that minority researchers and physicians are more likely to work in minority communities than their nonminority counterparts. STRIDE aims to increase the diversity and quality of the research workforce specifically in regard to the ongoing nationwide effort to better understand the complex health-related needs of low-income, medically underserved populations and thereby, ultimately, to reduce disparities in health care accessibility, quality, and outcomes. Project STRIDE will also provide an in-depth health science immersion experience to underrepresented high school students, though all program enrollees will be primarily from King/Drew Magnet High School of Medicine and Science, Health Sciences Academy and other high schools in the Watts community of South Los Angeles. The STRIDE education and training experience will encompass exposure to critical methodologies and principles of biomedical and clinical research in disease areas identified by Healthy People 2020 as disproportionately prevalent among underserved minority and low income communities. This ten week clinical research program will require the student to work full-time with an assigned mentor on a research project of their interest. Students will write an abstract on the project, create a poster and give a presentation at a Research Day. Participants will receive a stipend for their involvement.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Short-Term Research Experience Program for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP)

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) of the National Institutes of Health is the sponsor for the Short-Term Research Experience Program for Underrepresented Persons (STEP-UP Program). The program provides an opportunity for high school and undergraduate students to conduct biomedical research for eight (8) to ten (10) weeks in the summer in labs throughout the country. The purpose of the program is to increase the number of ethnic minorities who are involved in biomedical research with an emphasis on the areas of diabetes, digestive and kidney diseases. There is a critical shortage of minorities in biomedical research and the health professions (Hispanic/Latino, African Americans, Native Americans, Asian Pacific Islanders, and Alaskan Native Population). As a result, critical insights and perspectives from these groups are lacking in the development, implementation, and evaluation of the growing and important field of biomedical research and health science. The program is a collaborative effort between the NIH and CDU as well as University of California San Francisco, University of Hawaii and the University of Nevada Las Vegas.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Team Science Training

Participation in collaborative team science endeavors that can foster translational breakthroughs requires interdisciplinary collaboration. Despite the depth of knowledge that experts from different disciplines possess, difficulties can arise as these individuals seek to work across boundaries to coordinate and integrate their frameworks, perspectives, and ideas. To address these barriers to collaboration, training modalities must be adapted to meet the needs of researchers so that they will be better equipped to work and lead at the interface of disciplines and practice communities. More specifically, researchers will need to be prepared to communicate across disciplinary boundaries, manage teams (i.e. leadership), lead in collaboration with other leaders (i.e. shared leadership) and write research grants that simultaneously address basic, clinical and translational questions. To prepare researchers for success, team science training will help researchers to effectively launch translational research teams. Drawing on National Science Foundation supported research by Salazar & Lant (2012), team science provides investigators with two types of short-term interventions: 1) strategic team mapping to identify how to best assemble a team to foster collaboration around their focal research question, and 2) utilization of four evidence-based communication principles to support cross-boundary knowledge sharing, integration and creation.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Incubators, licensing and entrepreneurship

Harold and Pauline Price Center for Entrepreneurial Studies

The Harold and Pauline Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation is a recognized leader in entrepreneurial education and research at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. Working closely with its board of advisors, the Price Center fosters the study and practice of entrepreneurship and business innovation by providing the foundation on which creativity can flourish and individuals can succeed.

At UCLA Anderson, MBA students may choose to take several advanced electives that focus on entrepreneurial or emerging ventures. These courses include venture initiation, small business management, financing emerging enterprises, and business plan writing. Field studies (six-month consulting projects by teams of three to five students) may be conducted with entrepreneurial firms as well. The Entrepreneur Association (EA), the largest student organization at UCLA Anderson, sponsors extracurricular activities that provide involvement opportunities for students, entrepreneurs, and business developers. These programs include noon speakers, an annual conference on entrepreneurship and The Knapp Venture Proposal Competition. Particularly innovative programs are the Venture Fellows Program and the Student Investment Fund, which provide hands-on experience in the venture capital and investment management fields.

Research conferences and disseminate information based on the latest management research. Our management development programs offer industry-specific executive development seminars. Past programs have targeted minority and women-owned businesses, construction contractors, vendors to utility companies, and the directors of Head Start preschool programs.

The Price Center resides in Entrepreneurs Hall in the UCLA Anderson education complex.

Last updated September 1, 2016

The Knapp Venture Competition at UCLA

Now in its 34th year, the student-run Knapp Venture Competition, hosted at UCLA Anderson School of Management by the Harold and Pauline Price Center for Entrepreneurial Studies and the Entrepreneur Association, is designed to provide UCLA Anderson students with an intensive learning experience in the venture initiation process by simulating the process of starting and evaluating an entrepreneurial enterprise.

While a business plan is the tangible outcome of each team's efforts, generating the document in and of itself is not the Competition's primary objective. Rather, the Competition encourages a rigorous and cross-disciplinary application of the tools that students have learned in the MBA program. It requires them to integrate concepts from the core curriculum - economics, finance, operations, marketing, accounting, strategy, and organizational development - into a total plan for starting and operating a business.

By refining their concept, researching its feasibility, building a management team, and preparing and presenting their plan, students test the full range of analytical and communications skills that they have developed while at Anderson. Moreover, they learn about their ability to work as a team and manage group dynamics. Finally, the screening and evaluative portions of the Competition provide a solid feedback mechanism to the student teams. Dozens of faculty, entrepreneurs, alumni, professional investors and advisors serve on the judging panels that evaluate each team's efforts.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Office of Intellectual Property and Industry Sponsored Research

OIP-ISR supports UCLA's research, education and service mission by:

  • Commercializing intellectual property rights; 
  • Facilitating collaborations with industry for next-generation scientific breakthroughs;
  • Advancing UCLA entrepreneurship and research; while
  • Protecting the university’s interests by managing risk; and
  • Promoting economic growth in California.

The scope of activities include:

  • Commercially evaluating new technologies;
  • Determining patentability and commercial value;
  • Prosecuting patents;
  • Marketing and licensing inventions;
  • Facilitating UCLA faculty startups;
  • Engaging industry to facilitate research collaboration;
  • Negotiating license agreements and Material Transfer Agreements; and
  • Receiving and distributing royalties and other income to the inventors, UCLA Campus and its Departments.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Venture Capital Fund

The UCLA Venture Capital Fund is a community of UCLA alumni and friends whose core purpose is to support and promote entrepreneurship at UCLA. The VC Fund mentors faculty and students, fosters the growth of UCLA companies, and connects entrepreneurs with an interest in UCLA. Members have the opportunity to advise campus entrepreneurship initiatives, raise funds for UCLA start-ups, and ultimately to advance UCLA as one of the top entrepreneurial universities in the nation.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Moblie health institutes and centers

UCLA Wireless Health Institute (WHI)

UCLA’s Wireless Health Institute (WHI) faculty frequently collaborate with CTSI researchers, lending their unique technological developments and expertise to innovative and cross-disciplinary research projects. WHI pioneered development of the Open mHealth Architecture, which is built on structured health data and  helps companies, organizations, and individuals exchange data and reuse code and makes data easier to understand. WHI uses schemas to define the structure of health data and brings together top clinical, experts, data scientists, developers and software architects to come up with simple, extensible, and clinically valid schemas for the most common and important types of data in healthcare. mHealth data can be processed within Open mHealth and then joined with EHR-derived variables to create analytic data sets ready for statistical analysis.

Last updated September 1, 2016

NIH MD2K (Mobile Data to Knowledge) Center of Excellence (part of the Big Data to Knowledge [BD2K] initiative)

NIH MD2K (Mobile Data to Knowledge) Center of Excellence, or MD2K, is one of 11 national Big Data Centers of Excellence awarded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as part of its Big Data-to-Knowledge initiative. The MD2K Center brings together leaders in computer science, engineering, medicine, behavioral science, and statistics from 12 universities (Cornell Tech, Georgia Tech, Northwestern, Ohio State, Rice, UCLA, UC San Diego, UC San Francisco, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University of Memphis, the University of Michigan and West Virginia University), and Open mHealth (a non-profit organization). The MD2K Team is developing innovative tools to make it easier to gather, analyze and interpret health data generated by mobile and wearable sensors. MD2K’s goal is to develop big data solutions that reliably quantify physical, biological, behavioral, social, and environmental factors that contribute to health and disease risk. MD2K’s research is expected to improve the health of individuals through early detection of adverse health events and by facilitating prevention. The MD2K Team aims to lay the scientific foundations for turning the wealth of mobile sensor data available through new and rapidly evolving wearable sensors into reliable and actionable health information, and contribute to the vision of predictive, preventive, personalized, participatory, and precision (P5) medicine.

Last updated September 1, 2016

The Los Angeles (LA) PRISMS Center

The Los Angeles (LA) PRISMS Center promotes the development and application of mobile health (mHealth) technologies in order to deepen scientific understanding and clinical management of pediatric conditions. Bringing together leading experts from UCLA and USC in biomedical informatics, computer science, wireless health, environmental science and health, and pediatrics, this Center uses innovative end-to-end software infrastructure for pediatric sensor-based health monitoring. As part of this endeavor, the Biomedical REAl-Time Health Evaluation for Pediatric Asthma (BREATHE) platform, provides an extensible framework for the deployment of data collection protocols; secure data collection from sensors to a mobile device; integration of additional contextual information; and real-time analysis. Specifically, BREATHE is structured upon three closely coordinated efforts including: Integrated Sensing from the Device to the Cloud, which establishes APIs for automatically gathering information from a device and local sensors, communicating with the PRISMS sensors and coordinating data center; Integrating & Visualizing Clinical, Environmental, and Sensor Data, which focuses on combining data acquired from the data center with contextual information (e.g., regional air quality, clinical elements from the patient’s electronic health record, etc.) with real-time processing and analysis infrastructure; and Real-time Asthma and Air Pollution Project (Asthma APP), which has developed a framework for evaluating system performance and real-world field testing of the platform for self-management and early interventions. Collectively, these projects are changing how we interact with pediatric asthma patients and their caregivers to actuate a better understanding of the disease and improve adherence, and to achieve more personalized medicine through more detailed, objective measurements of an individual’s daily activities and surroundings, and further enables testing of many hypotheses about environmentally-related chronic pediatric illnesses.

Last updated September 1, 2016

CTSA Consortia

California Consortiums & Related Activities

California CTSA Education Consortium

The California CTSA Education Consortium is comprised of the directors of the training and workforce development programs of California institutions that are presently recipients of Clinical Translational Science Awards (CTSA), and whose intent is to collaborate on common key interests related to education and training in California and the resulting diversity of the populations involved in our research. The collaborating CTSA institutions include Scripps Research Institute, University of Southern California, Stanford University, UC Davis, UC Irvine, UC Los Angeles, UC San Diego, UC San Francisco and Oregon Health and Science University. The Consortium has a common goal of advancing the health of residents of California through our activities and has developed an agenda of shared activities considered to be highly relevant for all of their institutions and also nationally.

Activities underway or in development are:

  • Webinar on research in diverse populations – the Consortium will host a webinar every two months to cover core issues in research on diverse populations, addressing topics such as health disparities, research methods, and cultural competency. Each institute will contribute a session, drawing on institutional leaders.
  • Education and training related to research in diverse populations – the Consortium will have a working group charged with developing a foundation course, core and more advanced educational competencies, and reviewing existing curricular materials for the subject of diverse populations. The goal is to develop curricula materials that will be shared with Hubs nationally.
  • Informatics - the Consortium will prepare trainees for future of clinical and translational research by providing training on the utilization of electronic health records, large patient-based cohorts, and potentially massive data from genomics and other “omics” technologies. The Consortium will implement a working group to develop core competencies as a basis for developing curricular materials that might be used for short courses and formal courses.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCSF CTSI Mentor Development Program

The UCSF CTSI Mentor Development Program (UCSF CTSI MDP) has created an integrated environment for senior mentors and mentors-in-training, encouraging creative and innovative networking, discussing a range of mentoring challenges and a myriad of solutions, developing a toolbox of strategies, and using discussions and collective experiences to build a community of mentoring excellence. Ten to twenty late assistant, mid-level or early or late senior faculty are chosen to participate. The January to May program consists of monthly case-based seminars with senior clinical & translational mentors. Seminar topics include: Defining Mentorship from the Beginning: Rewards & Challenges of Mentorship; Balancing Work & Life; Communicating Effectively with Mentees; Understanding Diversity Among Mentees; Understanding UCSF Academic Advancement Policy; Understanding Economic & Fiscal Realities for Successful Academic Careers; Leadership Skills & Opportunities; and Grants: NIH, intramural: UCSF & CTSI Resources & IRB Issues.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Los Angeles Consortiums

Greater Los Angeles Consortium

The UCLA CTSI participates in the Greater Los Angeles Consortium to co-design and develop education and training curricula. There are three CTSA hubs in the Greater Los Angeles CTSA Consortium: University of California, Irvine, University of California, Los Angeles, and University of Southern California. The consortium offers a great opportunity to work together in activities that leverage our local talents and benefit both our local communities and our approaches to clinical research. Our collective goal is to collaborate to develop curricula and online courses that can ultimately be shared with the national consortia online while supporting collaborative efforts across the Greater Los Angeles area through onsite, in-person programs and seminars.

Curricula underway or in development include:

    UCLA
    • Biomedical Informatics for Clinicians - 2-week course familiarizes participants with the basic principles of biomedical informatics demonstrated by ongoing projects and services across the Greater Los Angeles Consortium. It will describe the use of data standards for representation and exchange of clinical information and the increasing use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies to annotate content. 
    • Therapeutic Discovery and Development - hosted by the UC Center for Accelerated Innovation through CTSI’s Training Program in Translational Science seminar series, this program provides an introduction to strategic and tactical planning for small molecule and antibody therapeutics. The course supports the CTSA’s objective to transform educational and career development programs to build the translational science workforce. 
    UC Irvine
    • The Science of Team Science Boot Camp - This one-day training will equip trainees, investigators, and community partners with best practices for leading and participating in effective team science endeavors. It will include evidence-based training modules on topics such as communication across boundaries, managing virtual teams, strategic planning and team design for clinical and translational research projects and best practices for developing translational grant proposals.
    • Introduction to Systems Biology for Clinical Translational Scientists - The Center for Complex Biological Systems (CCBS) will host this program designed as a preparatory workshop either in Biology or Mathematical/Computational Methods. The course will combine didactic lectures with hands-on laboratory experimentation or tutorials in mathematical/computational modeling. 
    USC
    • Regulatory Science for Clinical Research - The twice yearly boot camp will provide training directed primarily at study coordinators to expand their knowledge of and capacity for auditing and monitoring of clinical trials. The expanded skills will create a workforce that can cross-monitor trials, filling a common void in this expertise in academic settings. 
    • Engaging Diverse Communities in Clinical Research - This twice yearly boot camp will be hosted by USC's Workforce Development group and include didactic material on fundamental principles of successful engagement of diverse communities,supplemented by case examples of real-life challenges. The CTSI will share community engagement experiences working with diverse and underrepresented populations, including best practices in participant recruitment, outreach in diverse communities, community health workers as team members, and research with diverse, low-income, pediatric and aging populations.
    • Regulatory Science Boot Camp - This one-day training will equip trainees, investigators, and community partners with best practices for monitoring and auditing for Good Clinical Practice (GCP) and FDA inspections. It will include training modules on topics such as preparation and readiness for GCP and FDA inspection--with a focus on TMF, Source Data Verification (SDV), and Risk Based Monitoring (RBM), auditing of GCP systems for data integrity, sponsor audits and GCP audit processes and checklists for a hospital site audit for a Phase 1 study.

Last updated September 1, 2016

National CTSA Consortia

NCATS Accrual to Clinical Trials (ACT)

NCATS’ Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program supports efforts to solve system-wide translational research problems in part by developing and implementing ways to improve the success of U.S. clinical trials. One initiative, CTSA Accrual to Clinical Trials (CTSA ACT), was launched recently to do just that by developing a nationwide network of sites that share EHR data. Building on existing platforms and operating models to create a “federated” network with common standards, data terminology and shared resources, CTSA ACT investigators are focused on data harmonization (using the same term for the same type of data) across EHR platforms; technical needs assessment and implementation; regulatory approaches to ensure compliance with protocols for data access and participant contact; and governance development to establish proper agreements among institutions. NCATS ACT provides infrastructure for streamlined informatics solutions across the CTSA Consortium.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Child Health Research Acceleration Through Multisite Planning (CHAMP)

UC BRAID Child Health is viewed as a California-based template for the national network of CTSI-based child health researchers called CHAMP. CHAMP is designed as an incubator for multisite, investigator-initiated child health translational research. The CHAMP concept was selected for presentation at the July 2014 CTSA Principal Investigators Meeting. The idea has been vetted by a group of nationally recognized leaders in child health research. Both UC BRAID Child Health and CHAMP are responses to the Institute of Medicine’s 2013 report recognizing the seminal role that the CTSAs and NCATS could play in promoting child health clinical research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

NCATS-CTSA Lifespan Domain Task Force (DTF)

Dr. Peter Szilagyi from the UCLA CTSI is a member of the national steering committee of the Lifespan DTF, and also the national steering committee liaison to the “Single Disease Workgroup” within this Lifespan DTF. The goal of the Lifespan DTF is to integrate translational science across the entire lifespan to improve health for all populations, and to launch studies on special populations to prevent and better treat disease. The Lifespan DTF has 57 members (as of June 2015) including the 5 national steering committee members; and these members from CTSIs across the nation include researchers in child health, aging, OB-GYN, disparity populations, and other domains including representatives from patients, parents, and the community. 

Last updated September 1, 2016

CTSA Good Clinical Practices (GCP) Program

Good Clinical Practices is an international ethical and scientific quality standard for the design, conduct and record of research involving humans. Comprised of 13 core principles, GCP applies to all clinical investigations that could affect the safety and well-being of human participants (in particular, clinical trials of medicinal products). GCP was developed by the regulatory authorities of the EU, Japan and US in a steering group termed the Tripartite International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) and provides international assurance that data and reported results of clinical investigations are credible and accurate and rights, safety and confidentiality of participants in clinical research are respected and protected.

Last updated September 1, 2016

IRBrely

The IRBrely Initiative seeks to ease common challenges and burdens associated with initiating multisite research. Through this mechanism, collaborations are encouraged across a national network of institutions. By facilitating the conduct of multisite studies, IRBrely aims to help investigators obtain trial results faster, speeding development of new diagnostics, treatments, and preventative measures for patients, while continuing to maintain a strong level of human research protections, oversight, and regulatory compliance. IRBrely tests the feasibility for establishing infrastructure and processes to expand the use of system-wide IRB Reliance mechanisms. It involves the UC BRAID CTSA sites as well as Dartmouth SYNERGY, and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute of Southeast Wisconsin.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC Biomedical Research Acceleration, Integration, and Development (UC BRAID)

UC Biomedical Research Acceleration, Integration, and Development (UC BRAID)

UC BRAID is a consortium of the five UC medical campuses at UC Irvine, UC Davis, UC San Francisco, UC San Diego, and UC Los Angeles in collaboration with the UC Office of the President. In 2008, they identified system-wide collaboration in biomedical research as an opportunity to enhance clinical and translational research efforts. In response, they launched an initiative in 2010 to identify policy changes and areas of collaboration to accelerate biomedical research across the UC biomedical campuses. The UC BRAID program is this effort to accelerate clinical and translational research that improves health, by integrating resources and talent across the University of California. The mission of UC BRAID is to create an environment that reduces barriers, leverages and combines resources, enables teams, and serves as a model for collaborative consortia. UC BRAID’s collaborative initiatives include biobanking, contracting, regulatory (federated IRB), UC Research Exchange (UC ReX), UC Center for Accelerated Innovation (UC CAI), child health, drug device discovery and development (D4) and EngageUC.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Alpha Stem Cell Clinic

The UCLA-UCI Alpha Stem Cell Clinic (ASCC), under the Direction of Dr. John Adams, accelerates the implementation of clinical trials and delivery of first-in-man stem cell therapies by providing world-class, state-of-the-art infrastructure to support clinical research. The UCLA-UCI ASCC is a first-of-its-kind collaboration between the University of California, Los Angeles, Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research and University of California, Irvine Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center. It is one of three clinics (alongside City of Hope and UC San Diego) each funded through a five year $8M grant from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), the state’s stem cell agency. These three Alpha Clinics comprise the CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic Network. Current clinical trials at UCLA include those on Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID), Sickle Cell Disease, HIV, Ischemic Stroke, Glioblastoma Multiforme and X-linked Chronic Granulomatous Disease among others. ASCC provides preliminary data for the PCI FAC pilot for developing, deploying, and accelerating CIRM-funded clinical research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Drug Device Discovery and Development (D4)

The Drug, Device, Discovery and Development workgroup is a UC BRAID committee focused on the early translation of academic discovery research into valuable and impactful therapies. D4 is leveraging the combined strengths and resources of the five campuses to accelerate this translation process. D4 is developing initiatives across 4 areas that are critical to accelerating drug and device development. These include: academic-private partnerships; training and mentorship; translational resource sharing; collaborations and grant opportunities. D4 works to improve competitiveness of UC researchers for translational funding opportunities; develop cross-campus collaborations for early translational projects; facilitate access to translational resources and infrastructure on each campus; and share successful programs and services that support translational researchers.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC BRAID Biobanking Initiative

Lead by UCLA’s Dr. Sarah Dry, the UC BRAID Biobanking Initiative was established in order for biobanks to meet emerging federal standards and help accelerate the pace of translational research. It aims to aid in the creation of best practice documentation and a governance model for high-quality biospecimens banks. Through an inclusive governance model and standard processes for “UC-recognized” biobanks, this initiative hopes to ensure biosamples are the highest possible quality and that biobanks are operating ethically and meet professional accredited standards. It also aims to develop biobanking educational programs. Biobanking resources include standard operating procedures for distribution, procurement and storage as well as shared resources on developing efficient and ethical approaches to biobanking research within the UC, governance of biobanks, and outlining best practices for establishing biobanks at UC facilities.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC BRAID Center for Accelerated Innovation (UC CAI)

The mission of the UC CAI, a collaboration of the five UC medical campuses, is to translate NHLBI- and NIDA-funded discoveries to improve health and healthcare and address unmet medical needs. The transition is accelerated by applying business and product-development practices from the biomedical industry to advance the most promising technologies toward commercialization. Based at UCLA, the UC CAI has four goals: engage University of California research innovators in entrepreneurism through a comprehensive education, training and mentorship program; solicit and select technologies with high commercial potential that align with the NIH Institute’s mission and address unmet medical needs or significant scientific opportunity; incubate our most promising technologies in accordance with industry requirements to facilitate their translation to commercial products that improve patient care and enhance health; and create a high-performing, sustainable infrastructure that will serve as a model to academic research centers. The UC CAI provides the support for CTSI courses such as Therapeutic Discovery & Development which will help support workforce aims in developing online training and education efforts. UC CAI will also work with the CTSI on developing an experiential learning opportunity in industry and venture capital.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC BRAID Child Health

UC BRAID Child Health (BRAID-CH) is the child health component of UC BRAID, the consortium of UC Irvine, UC Davis, UC San Francisco, UC San Diego, and UC Los Angeles, who have partnered to enhance multi-site research and dissemination of research. The 5 institutions have committed cores from each CTSA to support child health research. BRAID-CH serves as a UC consortium of academic and industry-based experts and a web-based “toolkit” to support investigators at the earliest planning phases of multisite clinical research. BRAID-CH engages CTSA and non-CTSA groups to overcome barriers that have impeded progress in the rapid implementation of child health CTR, including: challenges of recruiting from a variety of clinical and community settings and often highly vulnerable populations (e.g., premature newborns); unmet need for rare disease therapies; imperative of caregiver consent; lack of interoperable semantic and data management models; and adverse effects that might emerge later in life. BRAID-CH is a “one stop shop” for UC investigators to provide nascent groups with: effective clinical research team building skills; informatics tools that facilitate collaboration; secure websites for sharing ideas and protocols; acceleration of child-health specific IRB and contracting processes; and facilitated interaction with national research networks (such as the Neonatal Kidney Multidisciplinary Collaborative, the Pediatric Heart Network, and the former Child Health Point-Person-Project). BRAID-CH functions as a “learning platform,” incorporating ongoing CTSA networking enterprises in cohort discovery and reliance IRB, as well as project management tools from industry that have proven effective in keeping clinical trials on track and cost-effective, while at the same time encouraging innovation, critical thinking, and the next generation of UC CTR leaders. As an example of multi-site work, in August 2014, UC BRAID Child Health held an Autism Translational Research Summit to develop and implement a strategic plan for clinical research on autism. As a second example, each of the 5 institutions committed $50,000 to support two pilot UC BRAID Child Health projects that involved multi-site research. The RFA was released in March 2015, and two grants were awarded in July 2015.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC BRAID Contracting Initiative

Contracting offices face increasing internal and external pressure to improve turnaround times for clinical trial contract execution. At the same time, the proliferation of multisite studies provides opportunities for institutions to align contract negotiations and leverage one another’s resources. To address these challenges, UC BRAID convened a workgroup of campus contracting leadership to: measure and improve clinical trial contracting performance, share best practices and lessons learned, increase collaboration for multisite clinical trial agreement (CTA) negotiations and mitigate redundant effort and conserve resources.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Federated IRB (UC IRB Reliance Registry)

The UC Institutional Review Board Reliance Registry was developed by the UC Office of the President’s Research Policy Analysis and Coordination office in partnership with the IRB Offices at all UC campuses and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It was tested by faculty researchers at several UC campuses. We continue to refine the UC IRB Reliance Registry to meet the needs of the research faculty and the IRB staff, with three guiding principles in mind: reduce administrative burden on investigators, facilitate multi-campus research collaborations and protect participating human subjects. With over 490 studies and 1500 UC faculty and research coordinators using it for the last 2 years, the UC IRB Reliance Registry is probably the most robust and widely used non-commercial IRB reliance tool in the nation.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC Research eXchange (UC ReX)

The University of California Research eXchange (UC ReX) is a joint activity of the 5 University of California (UC) CTSAs, charged with fostering multi-site clinical research by providing access to harmonized clinical data from the 5 health systems. The UC ReX Data Explorer is a secure online system designed to enable UC clinical investigators to identify potential research study cohorts spanning the five UC medical centers. The Data Explorer allows investigators to conduct interactive searches of data derived from patient care activities at Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco. Search criteria can include demographics, diagnosis and procedure codes (ICD-9 and CPT), labs, and medications. The output of each query from the UC ReX Data Explorer is a numeric count of patients by site that match the criteria identified in the query. The numeric count helps investigators assess the feasibility of their study idea by identifying whether there are sufficient numbers of prospective subjects within the UC system.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UC TrialQuest

UC TrialQuest is the first UC-wide clinical trials search tool. It allows groups involved in the research process to search clinical trials across the five UC Health campuses in real time using a simple web-based search. UC TrialQuest was built in conjunction with UC San Francisco’s CTSI Virtual Home team, the UC Institutional Review Board (IRB) Directors, and the UC Office of the President. Benefits include: IRB staff can find trials to be opened at multiple sites using a single IRB review, reducing redundant effort between the campuses and accelerating trial activation; Contract negotiators can identify common studies or sponsors, then share the clinical trial agreement (CTA) terms, budgets, and contractual language; and Researchers can discover collaboration opportunities or multicenter clinical trials in which to participate, and/or rely upon existing IRB approvals, helping to accelerate clinical research within the CTSI.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Regulatory

Data Safety Monitoring Plan

Next Steps

Contact: Terra Hughes
Regulatory Compliance
tnhughes@mednet.ucla.edu

Data and safety monitoring is required for clinical trials and may be required for other types of clinical research studies.

No boilerplate is available because the data and safety monitoring plan must be commensurate with the risk, size, and complexity of the study.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Data Sharing

Next Steps

Contact: Bethany Myers
Research Informationist
UCLA Biomedical Library
310-794-2030
bethanymyers@library.ucla.edu

As of October 2003, all investigators who are requesting more than $500,000 per year in annual direct costs* are required to submit a data sharing plan with their grant proposal. Data sharing plans should explain how investigators will make their final research data available, or explain why sharing of the data would not be feasible. Investigators may also request grant funding in their budget section to cover the costs of their proposed sharing mechanism. In writing a plan, investigators should address:

  • mechanism for sharing. Will data be made publically available in a repository, or will they be made available only upon request?
  • timeliness of data sharing. Investigators should plan to make their final research data available at the time of publication of their results.
  • subject confidentiality and data security. Will be datasets be de-identified to prevent subject identification? How will data be protected from unauthorized access?
  • data sharing agreements. Such agreements outline the rights and responsibilities of users who request use of the data.

A number of resources are available to assist with writing a data sharing plan, including extensive documentation at the NIH’s Data Sharing Policy site. The DMPTool is a free, interactive web tool for writing data management and data sharing plans, including assistance for writing plans that meet NIH’s requirements.

*This policy may be broadened to include additional types of grant proposals in response to the Office of Science and Technology Policy’s memo regarding the sharing of research results.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Human Subjects Protection

Next Steps

Contact: Terra Hughes
Regulatory Compliance
(310) 794-7504
tnhughes@mednet.ucla.edu

NIH requires compliance with federal policy for the protection of human subjects in clinical research. NIH defines clinical research as:

  • Patient-oriented research. Research conducted with human subjects (or on material of human origin such as tissues, specimens and cognitive phenomena) for which an investigator (or colleague) directly interacts with human subjects. Excluded from this definition are in vitro studies that utilize human tissues that cannot be linked to a living individual.  
  • Patient-oriented research includes:

    • mechanisms of human disease,
    • therapeutic interventions,
    • clinical trials, or
    • development of new technologies.
      • epidemiologic and behavioral studies
      • outcomes research and health services research

Last updated September 1, 2016

Responsible Conduct of Research

Next Steps

Contact: Terra Hughes
Regulatory Compliance
(310) 794-7504
tnhughes@mednet.ucla.edu

The following boilerplate is intended for people who have taken or plan to take UCLA's M261 course on the Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Humans.

As a __(insert)__ trainee, I plan to take a course in the responsible conduct of research. The main UCLA course, entitled “Responsible Conduct of Research Involving Humans” (M261), is a didactic course of 20 hours taught over one quarter with expert faculty members leading discussions in a particular topic area. Students are expected to read course materials and actively participate in classroom discussions of relevant case scenarios. Topics covered include Responsible Conduct of Research, Professionalism and the Ethical Imperatives of Clinical Research, Protection of Research Subjects-- the IRB process, Managing the Practice of Research, Conflicts of Interest, Genetics and Stem Cell Research, Community and International Research, Misconduct, and Conflicts of Interest.

To build upon the above training, I will continue my responsible conduct of research training with my mentor, __(insert)__, while actively conducting my research project. My mentor will meet with me on a __(insert)__ basis and there will be additional collaborative meetings with colleagues to address specific related research topics. Some of those topics will include authorship, sharing of data, and data management.

The UCLA CTSI is strongly committed to upholding the highest ethical and professional standards in research endeavors and ensures all investigators, research staff, and students are educated and remain current in “best practices” in the responsible and ethical conduct of research. The comprehensive mentoring and training activities in this area will thoroughly prepare me to accomplish the proposed research and educational training activities during the period of this award and into the future as I renew such training every four years.

(optional content)
Other formats include both on-line and in-person opportunities for education. The CITI training platform for the Responsible Conduct of Research includes both a UCLA-specific RCR course as well as the CITI-provided course. Through an on-line training environment, University constituents self-identify for most of their required research training needs. The UCLA Office of the Human Research Protection Program, the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI), and the Health System Office of Compliance offer seminar series, covering topics such as “Protecting Encryption Research Data” and “Obtaining and Documenting Informed Consent” to which all trainees are invited.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Research cores

Animal Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Biobehavioral Research Core

Biobehavioral Research Core

The Biobehavioral Research Core offers behavioral testing in rodents that ranges from the assessment of general health and neurological function (e.g., sensory and motor function) to the measurement of complex behaviors such as social interaction, memory, and learning. Assessments can be utilized to: (1) study animal models of human diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, autism, and drug abuse, in addition to disease-specific behavioral effects of treatment/therapies, (2) uncover neurobehavioral deficits in transgenic animals, and (3) define the possible undesirable behavioral effects of drugs and biologics (gene, vaccine, and stem cell therapies).

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Mouse Genetics Core

Mouse Genetics Core

The Mouse Genetics Core offers a high-quality service to efficiently provide pathogen-free transgenic and knockout/knockin mice carrying genes of specific interest for biomedical research projects. The core not only produces genetically modified mice but also helps design the DNA constructs for pronuclear microinjection or gene targeting with the most up-to-date genetic technologies. The core also offers assisted fertilization services followed by embryo transfer to save mutant mouse lines that suffer from poor breeding, or to help rederive the line disease-free, as well as cryopreservation of embryos and sperm for conservation of valuable genetic resources.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Animal Cores – LA BioMed

Learn more about this core:
Large Animal Core

Large Animal Core

The LA BioMed Animal Care and Use Program is uniquely designed to accommodate large animal models, and is equipped with several large animal surgical suites containing anesthesia machines, monitoring equipment, fluoroscopes, and a CT Scanner. The major types of studies center around perinatal lung development, the effect of the fetal environment on development, antibody production, vascular implant surgery, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Services include: (1) protocol development, (2) animal procurement, (3) animal care procedures, (4) animal health programs, (5) special services, and (6) training programs.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Animal Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Behavioral Testing Core

Behavioral Testing Core

The Behavioral Testing Core (BTC) brings researchers together in a collaborative effort to link genes, disorders, and treatments with behavior. It is available to investigators interested in the determination of behavioral phenotypes in different mouse and rat strains, and the effects that various treatment options have on these phenotypic characteristics. In addition to providing training and guidance in experimental design, proposal preparation, and statistical analyses, the core offers BTC staff-performed experiments.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Center for Aids Research Humanized Mouse Core

Center for Aids Research Humanized Mouse Core

The overall goal of the Center for Aids Research (CFAR) Humanized Mouse Core is to provide the infrastructure, materials, animals, technical expertise, and support that will facilitate the use of humanized immunodeficient mice in studies examining the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV-induced disease and cancer. Services include: (1) procuring immunodeficient mice at a reduced cost, (2) providing specialized animal laboratories for the construction, housing, and maintenance of immunodeficient mice, (3) constructing humanized mice, (4) developing and optimizing new humanized mouse models, (5) providing technical expertise and consultation on humanized mouse models. The core also provides consultation in flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, PCR, and other assays.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Mouse Physiology Lab

Mouse Physiology Lab

The Mouse Physiology Core Laboratory facility is dedicated to the phenotypic assessment of mouse and rat models of disease using a wide variety of integrative approaches. Our aim is to provide a cost effective means for investigators to reveal important functional aspects of their mouse and rat models without having to individually invest in hiring skilled personnel and in the purchase of expensive instrumentation. We specialize in ultrasound (echo) & telemetric assessments, survival and non-survival surgeries, acute and chronic evaluations of cardiac and neuro-regulatory function as well as basic metabolic and exercise assessments. The lab is also capable of certification testing of new drugs or substances intended for human use by performing FDA approved (GLP certified 21 CFR part 58 including part 11 compliance) studies on rodent models.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Zebrafish Core

Zebrafish Core

The Zebrafish Core facilitates the use and quick access of common mutation, genetically-engineered transgenic zebrafish, and routine techniques of zebrafish manipulation by investigators. Services include: (1) providing space to house zebrafish and perform large-scale genetic screens, (2) providing embryos for experiments, (3) generation of transgenic zebrafish, and (4) cryostorage of zebrafish sperm and re-derivation of live fish. Training is available for select techniques and zebrafish husbandry.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Cell Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Biobank & Translational Research Core

Biobank & Translational Research Core

The Biobank & Translational Research Core is a state-of-the-art biorepository that provides biospecimens for research, a pipeline of assays, and digital image analysis tools to perform quantitative measurements in tissue. Pathology services include histopathology services and the development of protocols for new antibodies and in-situ hybridization probes. Image analysis services include: (1) imaging of human and animal cells and tissues on glass slides, (2) tissue sections or tissue microarrays, (3) analysis of digital images generated with single or multiple probes in visible light or fluorescent wavelength ranges, and (4) web-based interface for access to images.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Flow Cytometry Core

Flow Cytometry Core

The Flow Cytometry Core is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment for cell analysis and sorting, utilizing fluorescent probes targeted to specific cell-associated molecules to characterize the diversity and function of complex cell populations. Fluorescence-activated cell sorters can also individually identify and isolate live cells with a defined phenotype that can later be expanded and/or further studied.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Metabolism and Mitochondrial Research Core

Metabolism and Mitochondrial Research Core

The Metabolism and Mitochondrial Research Core provides comprehensive services for analysis of metabolism and mitochondrial function in the research setting, with plans to expand to provide clinical services. For in-depth mitochondrial characterization, services may include seahorse respirometry, seahorse XFp, mitochondrial isolation from tissue, seahorse data analysis, keyence microscope, indirect calorimetry (CLAMS), CLAMS data analysis, body composition (NMR), citrate synthase, complex 1, Amplex Red, Swelling Assay, and mtDNA/nucDNA. In-depth mitochondrial characterization may include mitochondrial morphometry, turnover rates, respirometry, membrane potential, mPTP susceptibility, cytochrome c release, free radical production, mtDNA sequencing and 8-oxo-dG analysis.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Core

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Core

The Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell (iPSC) Core at the Regenerative Medicine Institute uses the latest techniques to reprogram, expand, and characterize human iPSCs from human skin or blood tissues of healthy subjects and diseased patients. iPSCs are then turned into specific cells of the human body including components of the nervous system, eyes, blood, bones, heart, gut, liver, and pancreas, for use by researchers. Applications of this technology include human disease modeling-in-a-dish, developing human reporter cell lines via genetic modification, drug screening on pathological human cell types, and potentially developing cell replacement or regenerative therapies. The iPSC Core offers: (1) PSC quality control and characterization services, (2) bio-banking and PSC thawing, (3) imaging services, (4) cell lines, (5) custom MEF generation, and (6) training.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Tissue Culture Core

Tissue Culture Core

The Tissue Culture Core is utilized by investigators for establishing and storing permanent cell lines. Special expertise in the area of human tissue/cell handling is available, including the critical function of developing immortalized B-cell lines (lymphoblastoid cell lines) from participants in large-scale genetics studies. Other procedures include: (1) plasma and serum separation, aliquotting, and storage, (2) sterile and viable lymphocyte separation and storage, (3) separation and storage of buffy coat pellets, and (4) establishment and long-term culture of chondrocyte and fibroblast cell lines.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Cell Cores – LA BioMed

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High-Resolution Tissue Respirometry Core

High-Resolution Tissue Respirometry Core

The High-Resolution Tissue Respirometry (HRTR) Core supports investigators in mitochondrial physiology and pathophysiology studies. The core provides consultation, training, and services for assessment of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated mitochondria, permeabilized cells, or tissue preparations. The HRTR Core uses Oroboros Oxygraph-2k High Resolution Respirometry equipment. Applications of HRTR include: (1) diagnosis of acquired and genetic mitochondrial diseases, myopathies, and neuromuscular pathologies, (2) study of pathologies with reduced cellular respiration, (3) studies on cell function and cell death, (4) aging and senescence, (5) oxidative stress and antioxidant systems, (6) ischemia-reperfusion injury, (7) cancer research / pharmacological tests, (8) environmental stress, and (9) metabolic substrate balance.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Bioimaging and Immunotherapeutics Research Core

Bioimaging and Immunotherapeutics Research Core

l time, and detection of signals from tissue, petri dishes, and microtiter plates; (3) a Luminex multiplex analyzer that utilizes xMAP microsphere technology and has the capability of performing up to 100 assays simultaneously in a single well of a microtiter plate; and (4) a Biotek Synergy 2 multi-mode microplate reader, a combination luminometer-fluorometer-absorbance detector capable of reading 96-well and larger plates that utilizes both filter-based and monochromatic-based light-detection technology.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Cell Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Cellular Bioenergetics Core

Cellular Bioenergetics Core

The Cellular Bioenergetics Core provides access to the XF24-3, a unique instrument that quantifies the activity of two major cellular energetic pathways, mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis, in cultured cells. The XF Technology: (1) measures O2 consumption rate, extracellular acidification rate, and CO2 production rate of living cells simultaneously in real time, (2) does not require the addition of dyes, labels, or reporters, (3) is capable of assaying cell lines, primary cells, isolated mitochondria, and small tissue pieces, (4) typically requires only 30,000 to 80,000 cells/well in 24-well plates, (5) measures adherent cells without requiring trypsinization, (6) does not affect cells and plates, which can then be used for an additional assay, (7) allows measurements to be repeated multiple times to measure kinetic responses, and (8) accommodates the addition of up to four test compounds (drugs or substrates) to each well, with measurements performed before and after the addition of each compound.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Center for Aids Research Virology Core Laboratory

Center for Aids Research Virology Core Laboratory

The Center for Aids Research (CFAR) Virology Core Laboratory provides a wide array of services for both HIV/AIDS and other researchers. It offers testing services (p24 ELISA, real time and digital droplet PCR for the detection of HIV cDNA, HIV viral load), blood and blood cell products. In addition, the core maintains a fully equipped and stocked BSL2+ facility for scientists that do not have wet lab space, new investigators joining UCLA or investigators that do not have such lab space. The UCLA/CFAR Virology Core Laboratory also maintains real time PCR instrumentation and a QX200 Bio Rad Digital Droplet PCR System. Finally,the core is able to assist individual researchers with special projects related to, but not limited, HIV detection.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Embryonic Stem Cell / Transgenic Mice Shared Resource

Embryonic Stem Cell / Transgenic Mice Shared Resource

The Embryonic Stem (ES) Cell / Transgenic Mice Shared Resource provides a multi-tiered service to produce: (1) transgenic mice using pronuclear injection, (2) targeted genetic alterations in ES cells, and (3) murine strains derived from ES cells with targeted mutations. The core provides advice to investigators on the design and assembly of DNA constructs, the availability of transgenic animal models, and evaluating and implementing new methodologies as they arise. In addition to providing consulting services, the ES Cell / Transgenic Mice Shared Resource provides materials (expression vectors, quality-assured ES cells, batch-tested sera and reagents) to investigators opting to undertake these projects in their own laboratories.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Flow Cytometry Core Laboratory

Flow Cytometry Core Laboratory

The core laboratory provides instrumentation and technical and professional assistance for performing laser-based flow cytometric analysis and cell sorting. The facility also offers training in basic flow cytometry principles and in the operation of analytic cytometers. A second course teaches nucleic acid analysis and measurement of proliferation by flow cytometry as well as hands-on instrument set-up and use of the specialized DNA analysis software.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Molecular Screening Shared Resource

Molecular Screening Shared Resource

The MSSR is a core facility open to all research labs on campus. The services provided include the use of high throughput screening (HTS) technology, a total of roughly 200,000 compounds in various libraries, siRNA sets of the druggable genome for mouse and human and a database of results from screens. Please use the links above to find out more about the MSSR. The MSSR is currently funded by the JCCC, the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and the Dean’s office, David Geffen School of Medicine and the California NanoSystems Institute. 

Last updated Septem 1, 2016

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Vector Core

Vector Core

The Vector Core promotes and facilitates basic and translational research by providing investigators with access to vector technologies that enable efficient gene transfer to mammalian cells in culture and in vivo. Services include: (1) lentiviral, retroviral and adenoviral vector construction, (2) backbone vectors for cDNA expression, (3) small-scale virus production for gene transfer into cell lines, (4) high-titer virus production for gene transfer into primary cells and in vivo, (5) and consultation for vector modalities, troubleshooting, support documentation for grants.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Computational Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Biostatistics & Bioinformatics Core

Biostatistics & Bioinformatics Core

The Biostatistics & Bioinformatics Core is a resource for biostatistical and bioinformatics consulting and related methodological research, and serves as a focal point from which investigators may draw statistical expertise for planning, management, and analysis of their studies. Faculty and staff at the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core: (1) coordinate and manage statistical activities at Cedars-Sinai to ensure that investigators have ready access to statistical consultation and support, (2) provide statistical expertise in the design of experiments and studies, including research proposal development, sample size determination, randomization procedures and plans for interim reviews and final analysis, (3) assist with the writing of statistical components of manuscripts, (4) review the integrity and statistical soundness of all studies involving human subjects, (5) provide statistical analysis for projects using appropriate statistical and computing methodologies and assist in the interpretation and presentation of results, (6) interact and collaborate with the Clinical Research Office in the development of protocols and the monitoring and reporting of clinical data, (7) maintain a computing facility with up-to-date software for statistical analysis to support program project investigators, and (8) conduct biostatistical and bioinformatics methodology research on practical problems arising in basic science populational and clinical studies.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Computational Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Computing Technologies Research Laboratory

Computing Technologies Research Laboratory

The Computing Technologies Research Laboratory (CTRL) specializes in research and clinical data collection, management, and reporting solutions. They develop Internet-accessible, web-based database applications that enable and enhance clinical & basic research and education, in the biomedical community. Services include: (1) web application development, (2) mobile app programming, (3) database design and hosting, and (4) digital video production / telemedicine for conferencing and the classroom.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Department of Medicine Statistics Core

Department of Medicine Statistics Core

The primary objective of DOMStat is to provide study design and statistical analysis collaboration to investigators in the Department of Medicine. DOMStat offers faculty and staff level statistical collaboration for grant proposals, data analysis, manuscript preparation, and other research activities requiring statistical input.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Informatics Center for Neurogenetics and Neurogenomics

Informatics Center for Neurogenetics and Neurogenomics

The Informatics Center for Neurogenetics and Neurogenomics (ICNN) provides CNN faculty experts in statistical genetics, gene expression analysis, and bioinformatics will oversee the activities of highly-trained staff members who will accomplish three goals: 1) provide expert consultation and analyses for neurogenetics and neurogenomics projects; 2) develop and maintain a shared computing resource that will include a computational cluster for computation-intensive analyses, web-servers and state-of-the-art software tools for a wide range of applications (including user-friendly versions of public databases, as well as workstations on which ICNN users will be trained to employ these tools; and 3) provide hands-on training in analysis and informatics to the users. ICNN is developing a whole-genome data analysis pipeline, aimed at filtering and prioritizing genetic variation identified in whole-genome sequencing studies for further study.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Semel Institute Biostatistics Core

Semel Institute Biostatistics Core

The Semel Institute Biostatistics Core (SIStat) is a team of expert biostatisticians, methodologists, and research support staff. The mission of the core is to foster research productivity and quality by helping faculty design sound research projects, obtain independent funding, and correctly analyze data. Services include: (1) development of electronic data entry systems, (2) biostatistics services, (3) development of patient assessment software, and (4) development of administrative systems software. Support is offered for projects ranging from small pilot studies to large, long-running, multi-site center studies.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Statistical / Biomathematical Consulting Clinic

Statistical / Biomathematical Consulting Clinic

The Statistical / Biomathematical Consulting Clinic (SBCC) provides assistance to health care researchers at every step of their task, from grant proposals through publication. Consulting services are available to biotech companies, physicians conducting clinical trials, clinicians conducting operations research, and students working on theses or post-doctoral research. Services include: (1) statistical analysis, (2) clinical trials preparation, (3) data preparation and editing, (4) assistance with grant methodology sections, (5) planning for data acquisition, (6) form design, (7) modeling, (8) programming, (9) study design/protocol development, (10) file maintenance, (11) programs for the PC, (12) workshops in statistics/methods, (13) design and/or implementation of databases, and (14) report preparation for proposals and/or publication.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Genetics Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Genomics Core

Genomics Core

The Genomics Core is focused on gathering Genome, Transcriptome, Epigenome and Metagenome information for investigators. Our mission is to make these complex technologies accessible and biologically interpretable for clinical and basic research scientists.

The Genomics Core enables investigators with little experience in sample preparation, quality control, or analysis to interrogate the genome. To facilitate this, we have developed general but complete wet-lab and bioinformatics analysis pipelines to accommodate standard needs and enable most genome-wide investigations. For more sophisticated or custom designs, we work actively in collaboration with other Cedars-Sinai cores and resources to facilitate investigations.

The Genomics Core now offers new applications, such as single-cell RNA sequencing, microbiome profiling and targeted transcriptome resequencing for FFPE samples, using a brand-new Illumina NextSeq, Illumina MiSeq and an Ion Proton™ Sequencer. The combination of instruments enables us to uniquely identify the best solutions for each project depending on sample size, sample quality, price and turnaround time.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Genetics Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Clinical Microarray Core

Clinical Microarray Core

The Clinical Microarray Core (CMC) is a CAP-accredited, fully automated, high-throughput genomic facility equipped with all major next generation sequencing and microarray platforms. The Core provides pre-experiment consultation and post-experiment support, including preparation of grant applications and publications, and strategic planning for additional research steps. The CMC also provides educational training to faculty, staff, and students to raise awareness on new directions and major discoveries in the areas of genomics and bioinformatics. Services include: (1) next generation sequencing, (2) microarray analysis, and (3) quality control services for RNA, miRNA, and DNA samples including RNA/DNA extraction, cDNA synthesis for quantitative-PCR, and qRT-PCR.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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DNA Microarray Core

DNA Microarray Core

The DNA Microarray Core offers data analysis services for microarray experiments, permitting investigators to identify potentially important genes with characteristic expression patterns from their microarray experiments. For gene expression arrays, the core offers differential two-group and multigroup gene expression analysis to identify statistical differences in gene expression between the different conditions of interest. Differentially expressed genes are further analyzed for enriched biological themes and pathways using the GeneGo software package. Services include: (1) library preparation for whole genome sequencing and RNA sequencing, (2) exome sequencing, and (3) data analysis and consultation.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Neuroscience Genomics Core

Neuroscience Genomics Core

The UCLA Neurosciences Genomics Core (UNGC) is currently operating an Illumina BeadLab 1000 high throughput SNP genotyping system (iScan), a Sequenom MassArray Compact mass spec and and two Illumina HiSeq 2500 next generation sequencing instruments in the Gonda research facility on the UCLA campus.  Services include: RNA/DNA sequencing (Non UCLA neuro labs please inquire about service availability). Custom snp genotyping using the high throughput Illumina iSelect assays and with the Sequenom iPlex assay. Genotyping using all currently available Illumina Infinium whole genome chips. Gene expression using Illumina human expression chips. Whole genome methylation using Illumina Meth-450 chips. Project costs can be highly dependent on scale, with significant discounts potentially applying to larger projects.
 For project specific pricing please contact
 Joe DeYoung, Facility Manager.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Human Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Biobank & Translational Research Core

Biobank & Translational Research Core

The Biobank & Translational Research Core is a state-of-the-art biorepository that provides biospecimens for research, a pipeline of assays, and digital image analysis tools to perform quantitative measurements in tissue. Pathology services include histopathology services and the development of protocols for new antibodies and in-situ hybridization probes. Image analysis services include: (1) imaging of human and animal cells and tissues on glass slides, (2) tissue sections or tissue microarrays, (3) analysis of digital images generated with single or multiple probes in visible light or fluorescent wavelength ranges, and (4) web-based interface for access to images.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Imaging Core

Imaging Core

The Imaging Core of the Biomedical Imaging Research Institute is an advanced imaging center that provides comprehensive imaging services for basic and clinical researchers. This facility is designed for: (1) human and small/large animal imaging, (2) advanced imaging and analysis techniques (MR, Nuclear, CT, Optical), (3) assisted use by highly experienced staff, including imaging technologists, animal care associates, registered nurse and radiochemist, (4) consultations on study design, imaging protocol, data analysis and post-processing, (5) radiolabeling and customized novel imaging probe development, (6) advanced MR spectroscopy and analysis techniques, (7) TCA cycle metabolic analysis with parahydrogen induced polarization, (8) umbrella protocols and bridge funding for pilot studies, and (9) research PACS and post-processing software.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Human Cores – LA BioMed

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Computed Tomographic Core

Computed Tomographic Core

The Computed Tomographic (CT) Core specializes in cardiac, vascular, and body composition imaging using advanced CT workstations, advanced quality control methods, systems storage, and analytical methods for multiple investigations. It provides unique services in atherosclerosis imaging including plaque quantification, perfusion imaging, and diagnostic services. In addition, the CT Core offers collaborations in the area of renal, hepatic, vascular, and pulmonary imaging, as well as body composition and endothelial function assessment.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Endocrine and Metabolic Research Core

Endocrine and Metabolic Research Core

The Endocrine and Metabolic Research Laboratory supports clinical and translational investigators in many aspects of research through expertise in analytical testing and development of new methods. Over forty different procedures are offered through the Endocrine and Metabolic Research Laboratory utilizing a variety of techniques including radioimmunoassay, fluoroimmunoassay, fluorometry and LC-MS/MS. Additionally, semen analyses and special andrological testing are available in the Andrology Laboratory.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Pulmonary Function and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Core Lab

Pulmonary Function and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing Core Lab

The pulmonary function testing (PFT) cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) core lab facility supports investigators in pulmonary function and cardiopulmonary exercise testing studies. PFT consists of an array of non-invasive tests of abnormality of lung mechanics and pulmonary gas exchange used to detect the presence of, and quantify the severity of, a range of lung diseases. CPET provides a whole-body assessment of the integrative exercise responses involving the pulmonary, cardiovascular, hematopoietic, neuropsychological, and skeletal muscle systems, which are not adequately reflected through the measurement of individual organ system function. The CPET Core Lab will provide consultation, training, and services for clinical research using PFT and CPET. The Core Lab is also highly-experienced in multicenter clinical trials using PFT and CPET measurements.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Human Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Biological Samples Processing Core

Biological Samples Processing Core

The facility offers DNA extractions from whole blood and other tissue types, and storage of extracted DNA. BSPC uses the Autopure LS™ nucleic acid purification instrument from Gentra Systems for extracting DNA. This instrument provides a highly automated process with very high quality DNA, samples are quantitated using OD 260/280. Once DNA has been obtained from the provided sample, it can be returned immediately or stored in -20°C freezer for future use. We'll also aliquot DNA at the desired concentrations. DNA can be stored indefinitely within BSPC. All samples are logged in our database and are bar-coded with our sample number and customer's identification code. BSPC will soon initiate RNA extraction.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers Laboratory

Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers Laboratory

The UCLA Center for Computer Vision and Imaging Biomarkers (CVIB) Laboratory provides global clinical and research services, including: (1) standardized multi-center imaging protocol development and quality control, (2) image de-identification, transfer, banking, and distribution, (3) cutting-edge quantitative image feature extraction, analysis, and data management, and (4) full service clinical trial management with regulatory compliance.
CVIB has an exclusive contract with MedQIA Imaging CRO (www.medqia.com) to provide FDA-compliant services for industry-funded clinical trials worldwide. CVIB also provides clinical quantitative imaging services within UCLA Healthcare and to overseas hospital departments.

Key attributes of the CVIB Core Laboratory are: (1) image quality, (2) accurate and reproducible quantitation, (3) rigorous science, (4) high throughput, (5) well-managed and on-time service, and (6) user friendly.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Center For Human Nutrition

Center For Human Nutrition

The Center for Human Nutrition provides Dual Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (DXA or DEXA) Body Composition Analysis. DXA body composition analysis is considered the “gold standard” for body fat testing, and gives an accurate measure for assessing health. Bone Mineral Density analysis is also available, which can be utilized for assessing bone health and diseases such as osteopenia and osteoporosis.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Exercise Physiology Research Laboratory

Exercise Physiology Research Laboratory

The Exercise Physiology Research Laboratory (EPRL) promotes the discipline of exercise physiology in research and teaching at the UCLA campus, and is unique in its focus on applied exercise physiology conducting human research. It promotes a prevention model of wellness, focused on forestalling disease development through the enhancement of health and fitness practices in individuals. Additionally, the research conducted in the EPRL analyzes cutting edge technology with an aim of improving performance in fitness enthusiasts and athletes alike. Health-fitness assessments include: (1) aerobic performance; (2) pulmonary function; (3) body composition; (4) muscle performance; (5) functional movement screen; (6) total energy expenditure; (7) sleep quality; (8) cardiovascular health risk & HRV; (9) posture; and (10) performance tracking.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Immunogenetics Center

Immunogenetics Center

The Immunogenetics Center provides comprehensive testing for organ and tissue transplantation to physicians, patients, pharmaceutical companies, and other medical facilities. It is one of the leading laboratories in the world, providing state-of-the-art technology and methodology with a comprehensive quality assurance program to ensure accuracy in testing. Services include: (1) HLA-class I (A,B,C) and class II (DR, DQ, DP) gene polymorphism typing, (2) histocompatibility testing (HLA antibody testing, MICA and endothelial cell antibody testing and crossmatch testing), (3) KIR and MICA gene typing and (4) immune assessment.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Pathology Research Portal

Pathology Research Portal

Two previous research laboratories, the Clinical and Translational Research Laboratory (CTRL) and the Clinical Immunology Research Laboratory (CIRL) have been restructured into the Pathology Research Portal (PRP). This new addition to the Center for Pathology Research Services functions as the biospecimen liaison between researchers and clinical testing, and provides coordination for sample receiving, accessioning, processing, short term and long term storage, dispatching to multiple core facilities for testing, and result retrieving. PRP also provides shipping and temporary storage services, and can also provide customized services to meet various research needs.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Translational Pathology Core Laboratory

Translational Pathology Core Laboratory

The Translational Pathology Core Laboratory (TPCL) provides an array of pathology-related services in support of basic, translational, and clinical research. Expert consultative services are offered to investigators in pathology-related study design, tissue selection, microscopic interpretation, immunohistochemistry/in situ hybridization, laser capture microdissection, digital image analysis, and IRB-related tissue questions. Services include: (1) tissue procurement, storage, and provision, (2) histology-related services, (3) immunohistochemistry, (4) in situ hybridization, (5) digital imaging and image analysis, (6) laser capture microdissection, (7) pathology consultative services, and (8) advice on research protocols, safety issues, and IRB applications.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Imaging Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Confocal & Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy Core

Confocal & Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy Core

The Confocal core provides imaging services for live and fixed samples such as cells and tissue sections, utilizing a variety of imaging techniques including spectral imaging, FRET, and FRAP. The Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy Core educates, trains, and supports investigators in in vivo imaging of small animal models (e.g., tumor biology, immunology, stem cell tracking, vascular imaging, senescence imaging, etc.). Consultation is available free-of-charge for initial experimental design, training, and for image analysis.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Imaging Core

Imaging Core

The Imaging Core of the Biomedical Imaging Research Institute is an advanced imaging center that provides comprehensive imaging services for basic and clinical researchers. This facility is designed for: (1) human and small/large animal imaging, (2) advanced imaging and analysis techniques (MR, Nuclear, CT, Optical), (3) assisted use by highly experienced staff, including imaging technologists, animal care associates, registered nurse and radiochemist, (4) consultations on study design, imaging protocol, data analysis and post-processing, (5) radiolabeling and customized novel imaging probe development, (6) advanced MR spectroscopy and analysis techniques, (7) TCA cycle metabolic analysis with parahydrogen induced polarization, (8) umbrella protocols and bridge funding for pilot studies, and (9) research PACS and post-processing software.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Imaging Cores – LA BioMed

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Bioimaging and Immunotherapeutics Research Core

Bioimaging and Immunotherapeutics Research Core

The Bioimaging and Immunotherapeutics Research Core provides four major resources to researchers: (1) the BD Calibur flow cytometer facility, which employs a dual-laser (argon and helium-neon), 4-color FACS Calibur flow cytometer and cell sorter to facilitate the molecular and physiological examination of individual cells and enable collection of living cells for further study; (2) the IVIS Lumina II system, a high-sensitivity, in vivo imaging technology platform that enables non-invasive visualization of both bioluminescent and fluorescent signals, tracking of cellular and therapeutic activities within a living organism in real time, and detection of signals from tissue, petri dishes, and microtiter plates; (3) a Luminex multiplex analyzer that utilizes xMAP microsphere technology and has the capability of performing up to 100 assays simultaneously in a single well of a microtiter plate; and (4) a Biotek Synergy 2 multi-mode microplate reader, a combination luminometer-fluorometer-absorbance detector capable of reading 96-well and larger plates that utilizes both filter-based and monochromatic-based light-detection technology.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Imaging Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Advanced Light Microscopy / Spectroscopy and Macroscale Imaging Facilities

Advanced Light Microscopy / Spectroscopy and Macroscale Imaging Facilities

The mission of the Advanced Light Microscopy / Spectroscopy (ALMS) and Macroscale Imaging Facilities is to provide consultation, services, and support for the application of novel microscopic and spectroscopic methods and advanced image analysis techniques for the study of macromolecules, cellular dynamics, and nano-scale characterization of bio-materials. The facilities provide a collection of high-level, customized biological fluorescence microscopes and small-animal imaging devices that provide the ability to study biological processes with high spatial and temporal resolution in whole organisms and in living cells down to the single molecule detection level with nanometer accuracy. Services include: (1) wide-field fluorescence imaging microscopy (on a limited basis), (2) confocal one-photon and two-photon laser scanning microscopy (point scanning and spinning disk), (3) fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, (4) fluorescence resonance energy transfer, (5) microscopic and macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging with time-correlated-single-photon-counting and near-infrared detection, (6) stimulated emission depletion laser-scanning microscopy, (7) microscopic and macroscopic (small animal) spectral unmixing, and (8) laser capture microdissection.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center

Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center

The Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center is committed to facilitating the development and growth of the field of Brain Mapping, a sub-discipline of neuroscience which uses brain imaging to better understand the structure and function of the human brain in health and alterations associated with disease. It is comprised of resources located in the core facility, the Ahmanson-Lovelace Brain Mapping Center, as well as additional resources housed in the Reed Neurological Research Center and the Neuroscience Research Building. Services include: (1) imaging (MRI and PET), (2) NeuroModulation, (3) data analysis, (4) data center, and (5) the DIVE (Data Immersive Visualization Environment).

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Biological Chemistry Imaging Facility

Biological Chemistry Imaging Facility

The Biological Chemistry Imaging Facility (BCIF) provides resources for data acquisition and analysis for radioactive, fluorescent, and photographic samples as well as digital imaging and document production. BCIF provides round-the-clock access to a cluster of modern equipment such as Typhoons 9410 and 9400 Variable Mode Imagers, Storm 820 and 840 imagers, Laser Densitometer, Gel Documentation System, color printers, and high-resolution scanners. In addition, BCIF provides unlimited scientific data storage space on its secure storage arrays to all participating labs and access to a number of software packages for data analysis and digital data processing.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Electron Imaging Center for Nanomachines

Electron Imaging Center for Nanomachines

The Electron Imaging Center for Nanomachines (EICN) provides state-of-the-art electron microscopy instruments and assisted usage services. Highly experienced staff provides necessary training and can help users address complex electron imaging needs. EICN offers advanced electron imaging techniques for visualizing materials, nanomachines, and cellular structures at atomic or nanometer scales in 2D and 3D. In addition, our latest integrated iCorr technology enables a streamlined approach to correlative microscopy to perform both fluorescence light and electron microscopy for biological research. Services available: (1) instrument training, (2) self usage, (3) assisted usage, and (4) data processing.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Electron Microscopy Service Center

Electron Microscopy Service Center

The Electron Microscopy Services Center houses a JEOL 100CX transmission electron microscope. A Reichert Ultracut ultramicrotome is also available for use by trained personnel. Services include: (1) fixation and embedding of specimens, thin sectioning, (2) use of the electron microscopes (with or without assistance), (3) gold labeling, (4) negative stain, and (5) light microscopy of plastic embedded materials. The facility offers advice on appropriate preparatory procedures and other technical matters. Training and assistance in the use of the electron microscope is also offered.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Microscopic Techniques Laboratory

Microscopic Techniques Laboratory

The Microscopic Techniques Laboratory offers instructions in microscopic techniques and assistance in tissue specimen preparation for light microscopic observation. Histological procedures available include: (1) some immunocytochemistry staining, (2) special stains, (3) paraffin sectioning, (4) slide preparation for in situ hybridization, (5) cryostat sectioning, (6) plastic embedding and (6) sectioning. The laboratory also provides staining setups, a cryostat, microtomes, and a Nikon photomicroscope for use by trained personnel.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Molecular Screening Shared Resource

Molecular Screening Shared Resource

The Molecular Screening Shared Resource (MSSR) is a core facility open to all research labs on campus. The services provided include the use of high throughput screening (HTS) technology, a total of roughly 200,000 compounds in various libraries, siRNA sets of the druggable genome for mouse and human and a database of results from screens. Please use the links above to find out more about the MSSR. The MSSR is currently funded by the JCCC, the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and the Dean’s office, David Geffen School of Medicine and the California NanoSystems Institute.. 

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Nano and Pico Characterization Laboratory

Nano and Pico Characterization Laboratory

The Nano and Pico Characterization (NPC) Laboratory provides Provides both state-of-the-art microscopic techniques to visualize surfaces, adsorbates, nanostructures and devices at the atomic and molecular scale as well as a unique opportunity for researchers to gain insight into local properties under a wide range of experimental conditions.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Preclinical Imaging Technology Center

Preclinical Imaging Technology Center

Provides state-of-the-art small animal imaging. It functions both as a shared preclinical imaging resource for UCLA researchers and as a hub for emerging imaging research and technology development. The same technologies and services are also available to the larger research community including other academic institutes and industry groups through contract work. The Imaging Center, operating through its sales-and-service, offers microPET, microCT, bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging modalities and complementary in vitro/ex vivo services including cell-based assays, biodistribution, digital autoradiography and dosimetry. Companion PET tracer radiochemistry and radiolabeling services are available in-house and is supported by on-campus cyclotron facilities. Technical and analytical support are available throughout the study process: initial consultation, experimental design and optimization, imaging protocols and techniques, post-acquisition data analysis and interpretation. Training and staff assistance The Imaging Center is part of the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging and is supported by the expertise of its faculty members, world leaders in various imaging sciences.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Translational Research Imaging Center

Translational Research Imaging Center

The Translational Research Imaging Center (TRIC) at UCLA is a state-of-the-art, pre-clinical and human cadaver, diagnostic and interventional imaging center. With over 25 years of expertise, our team of physicians, scientists, fellows, technologists, and veterinary staff support pre-clinical studies and imaging procedures across the field of medicine. TRIC is dedicated to the development and testing of new medical devices, imaging technologies, drug therapies as well as novel treatments. Our dedicated staff include: Board-certified Interventional Radiologists, Board-certified Radiologists, MR Physicists, Veterinarians, Statisticians, and Experienced Research Assistants. The TRIC Lab imaging equipment and support systems include: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – Siemens Magnetom 3T Prisma MRI whole-body system, X-Ray Angiography – Siemens Artis Zeego Angiogram Suite with robotic C arm with 3D rotational angiography and DynaCT capabilities, Computed Tomography (CT) – Siemens Somatom Definition 64 Dual Source scanner, X-Ray Angiography – Philips Allura Xper FD-10 Angiogram Suite with floor mounted C arm with 3D rotational angiography capabilities, iU22 Philips Ultrasound system for general imaging, PACS data management system, observation and recovery suites, multi-modality 3D-image post-processing, High-Definition video integration for Telepresence video conferencing.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Molecule Cores – Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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Biomarker Discovery Platform Core

Mass Spectrometry and Biomarker Discovery Core

The Mass Spectrometry and Biomarker Discovery Core strives to provide high-quality services to researchers interested in applying mass spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics technologies to address their biomedical research questions. The core provides fee-based services for protein identification and quantification, post-translational modification analysis and metabolite analysis. The core is also available to the research community for grant funded collaborative research inside and outside of Cedars-Sinai. Services include: (1) peptide in-solution, (2) gel bands/spots, (3) molecular weight determination by direct infusion, (4) post-translational modifications, and (5) metabolites.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Molecular Therapeutics Core

Molecular Therapeutics Core

The Molecular Therapeutics Core provides a cross-disciplinary resource for researchers engaged in structural biology, therapeutics development, and drug discovery research. Services include: (1) pilot recombinant protein production, (2) large-scale protein production, (3) biophysical characterization, (4) molecular modeling and drug design, and (5) x-ray crystallographic services. Initial consultations are available free-of-charge.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Molecule Cores – LA BioMed

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Biomedical Mass Spectroscopy Facility

Biomedical Mass Spectroscopy Facility

The Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Facility (BMSF) supports clinical research projects in clinical nutrition and metabolic research. The BMSF specializes in experimental design using stable isotopes and analytical methods (13C carbon tracing) for physiological or metabolic investigations. It provides unique services in isotopomer distribution analysis of metabolites (tracer-based metabolomics) using GC/MS (or LC-TOF). In addition, the BMSF offers collaborations in the area of metabolite profiling and modeling of metabolic systems with tracers. Services provided includes: (1) sample preparation, (2) quantitative and qualitative analysis by GC/MS, IRMS and LC/MS, (3) consultation, (4) collaboration in metabolite profiling and tracer-based metabolomics, and (5) training on approved projects.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Guenther Molecular Biology Core

Guenther Molecular Biology Core

The Guenther Molecular Biology Core supports investigators performing morphological, biochemical, cell and molecular biological studies both at cellular and subcellular levels. Consultation and training services are provided for localization of genes, RNA transcripts and proteins in complex tissues as well subcellular distribution in tissues. The laboratory houses five types of state-of the art equipment: an Agilent Bioanalyzer, two Applied Biosystem StepOne Plus Sequence Detection Systems, one Applied Biosystems 7900HT 384 well real-time quantitative PCR system, one Leica Confocal SP8 platform, and a Palm Microbeam. The Guenther Core also has a facility for immunohistochemistry studies.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Molecule Cores – UCLA-Westwood

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Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility

Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility

The Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility in the Department of Engineering provides the biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety of biomolecular characterizations. Instruments are available for: (1) molecular weight determination, (2) kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of ligand binding, (3) structural characterization, (4) gel documentation and analysis, (5) radioisotope detection and quantification, and (6) spectroscopy.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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J.D. McCullough Crystallography Laboratory

J.D. McCullough Crystallography Laboratory

Provides 3-dimensional structure of small molecules in solid crystals via X-ray crystallography. Equipped for characterization of polycrystalline solid materials using powder and thin film diffraction techniques. The laboratory is a full service facility where staff deals with all aspects of service from crystal selection to publication of results. In-house training is a requirement if you wish to use the equipment yourself. Part of the UCLA Molecular Instrumentation Center, which is a campus wide facility open to the UCLA community. The facility also collaborates with personnel from other universities and industry both locally and internationally.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Macromolecular Crystallization Facility

Macromolecular Crystallization Facility

Consultation and technical assistance available to researchers prior to, and following, experiments. Evaluation of sample via Dynamic Light Scattering. Automatic setup of 4000 crystallization conditions per hour using 500uL of sample. (Hanging or Sitting Drops) Capable of distinguishing between organic and inorganic crystals using a sophisticated UV/vis microscope. Optimization of crystallization conditions. Storage of plates in temperature controlled incubators at 4°, 15°, and 20° C. Optimization of crystallization conditions using a library of 1,500 commercial compounds. Production of stereolithography files from Pymol, 3D design of labware, 3D printing.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Magnetic Resonance Facility

Magnetic Resonance Facility

The Magnetic Resonance Facility houses six nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers and one electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Laboratory

Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Laboratory

The Mass Spectrometry and Proteomics Laboratory provides a wide range of sample characterization techniques for researchers. Mass spectrometry services include: (1) a variety of ionization methods including electron, chemical, matrix assisted laser desorption, direct analysis in real time, electrospray, and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization, (2) a variety of analyzers including time of flight, quadrupole, ion trap, Orbitrap, ion cyclotron resonance, and several tandem combinations of mass analyzers, and (3) microflow and nanoflow liquid chromatography. For proteomics studies, equipment is available for running and analyzing 1-D and 2-D gels, transferring mini- and mid-size gels, gel imaging, spot cutting, in-gel digestion, and protein/peptide identification. In addition, the facility provides consultation for sample preparation, experimental design, gel staining, analysis of protein expression patterns, western and lectin blots, in-gel trypic digestion, data mining, and operation of the various instruments. This laboratory is a part of the UCLA Molecular Instrumentation Center.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Materials Characterization Laboratory

Materials Characterization Laboratory

The Materials Characterization Laboratory offers thermal, optical, microscopic, electrical, and magnetic characterization of materials and elemental analysis of surfaces via a wide range of instruments including: (1) light scattering spectrometers, (2) several spectrophotometers, (3) scanning probe microscopes (AFM/STM), (4) a SQUID magnetometer, (5) a scanning electron microscope, and (6) an X-Ray photoelectron spectrometer. This laboratory is a part of the UCLA Molecular Instrumentation Center.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Metabolomics and Proteomics Center

Metabolomics and Proteomics Center

The UCLA Metabolomics and Proteomics Center enables investigators to study metabolism with a particular focus on central carbon metabolism (glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, nucleos(t)ide synthesis, etc.). Metabolite analysis can be performed on a variety of specimens (e.g. cultured cells, culture medium, blood, urine, tissue). Generally, relative amounts of metabolites are measured, but absolute amounts can be determined as well. Tracing experiments using stable isotope-labeled metabolites (D, C-13, N-15) are routinely performed. For data analysis, relative amounts of metabolites as well as mass isotopologue distributions (if isotope tracing was performed) are calculated. Results are illustrated using bar graphs, heatmaps, principal component analysis, and mapping to Cytoscape maps.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Molecular Screening Shared Resource

Molecular Screening Shared Resource

The MSSR is a core facility open to all research labs on campus. The services provided include the use of high throughput screening (HTS) technology, a total of roughly 200,000 compounds in various libraries, siRNA sets of the druggable genome for mouse and human and a database of results from screens. Please use the links above to find out more about the MSSR. The MSSR is currently funded by the JCCC, the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and the Dean’s office, David Geffen School of Medicine and the California NanoSystems Institute. 

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Pasarow Mass Spectrometry Laboratory

Pasarow Mass Spectrometry Laboratory

Provides consultation, training, and access to and technical assistance for metabolomics, proteomics (top-down and bottom-up) and targeted small molecule quantitation using mass spectrometery and contemporary chromatography.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Peptide Synthesis Core Facility

Peptide Synthesis Core Facility

The Peptide Synthesis Core Facility (PSCF) contains a dedicated fume hood for peptide deprotection and cleavage. The facility assists investigators performing multifaceted investigations of peptides by providing peptides that are difficult to synthesize, fold, and purify (e.g., beta-sheet peptides with multiple disulfide connectives, cyclic peptides, or amyloid peptides). In addition, the PSCF can synthesize isotope-edited versions of proteins and peptides suitable for detailed determinations of 3-D molecular structure by NMR spectroscopy or X-ray diffraction.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Protein Expression Technology Center

Protein Expression Technology Center

The Protein Expression Technology Center (PETC) was founded in 1994 to facilitate the expression and purification of proteins for structure/function studies. The PETC provides support in all aspects of protein expression from cloning through expression optimization and protein purification. The PETC is a UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics facility but is open to all researchers.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Proteome Research Center

Proteome Research Center

The UCLA Proteome Research Center is a full-service technology center that offers a comprehensive suite of proteomic services to the UCLA community and other partnering institutions. By bringing together state-of-the-art instrumentation and high-level technical staff, the goal of the facility is to transform traditional experimental paradigms by providing investigators access to powerful analytical workflows for systems-level characterization of complex biological systems, biomarker discovery and validation, and protein complex characterization. Available services include: (1) complex protein mixture analysis using single and multidimensional fractionation strategies, (2) peptide quantitation using SILAC, iTRAQ / TMT, and label-free methodologies, (3) targeted and global PTM enrichment and characterization approaches, (4) identification of protein interaction networks using affinity-based isolation and proximity tagging techniques, and (5) targeted proteomic assay development using parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) for relative and absolute quantitation.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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Surface Plasmon Resonance Core

Surface Plasmon Resonance Core

The Surface Plasmon Resonance Core consists of a Biacore 3000 instrument that uses a powerful technique called surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to monitor binding interactions between two molecules. The Biacore 3000 instrument provides precise, sensitive, real-time results, using microgram amounts of non-radiolabeled samples. In its ligand-recovery mode, the instrument can be used as a nano-affinity column to recover binding partners from crude mixtures of potential ligands. Its robotic recovery feature precisely transfers recovered samples to plates suitable for MS analyses. Services include: (1) selection and preparation of the biosensor chips using investigator-supplied proteins, (2) running binding assays at various analyte concentrations, (3) calculating the binding constants, (4) providing the raw and analyzed data to the investigator, and (5) discussion of the results.

Last updated September 1, 2016

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X-ray Crystallography Core Facility

X-ray Crystallography Core Facility

The X-ray Crystallography Core Facility in the Department of Engineering provides state-of-the-art resources to researchers, enabling the detailed 3-D analysis of biological macromolecules that play essential roles in human health. The facility operates as a full service core that offers access to sophisticated equipment and technologies as well as advice and technical assistance in sample preparation, data collection, processing, atomic refinement, and modeling. Services include: (1) aid in crystallization, (2) X-ray characterization of crystals, (3) X-ray data collection in-house and at the synchrotron, (4) processing and quality analysis of data, and (5) structure determination and display.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Shops – UCLA-Westwood

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Glass Shop

Glass Shop

The Glass Shop in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry provides the only scientific glassblowing facility on the UCLA campus for design and fabrication of glassware for research. The shop also provides repair and/or modification services of broken glass apparatus. Consultation is provided in research, design, and safety demonstration of the proper use and handling of gas, solid, or liquid materials. The Glass Shop is able to respond to critical emergency repair situations in research and teaching laboratories.

Last updated June 1, 2015

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Microelectronics Shop

Microelectronics Shop

The Microelectronics Shop provides technical support for research, teaching, and administrative functions. Two IT Programmer/Analysts and one Electronics Engineer are on staff to provide electronic design and fabrication for custom electronics solutions to unique situations encountered in research projects. The staff has expertise in Macintosh, IBM clone computers, peripherals, printers, and network interfacing, including installation, setup, upgrades, demonstration, troubleshooting, repair, and modification services. The Microelectronics Shop also provides design, development, and installation of local area networks, specifying hubs, network cards, cable types, and software. Consultation is provided to determine appropriate hardware/software solutions.

Last updated June 1, 2015

Research tools

California Health Interview Survey (CHIS)

The California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) is the largest state health survey in the nation and is conducted by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research in collaboration with the California Department of Public Health and the Department of Health Care Services. It is a random-dial telephone survey that asks questions on a wide range of health topics. CHIS is conducted on a continuous basis allowing the survey to generate timely one-year estimates. CHIS provides representative data on all 58 counties in California and provides a detailed picture of the health and health care needs of California’s large and diverse population. Participants in the CHIS survey are chosen at random and the sample is extensive enough to be statistically representative of California's diverse population. In addition, the sampling strategy and very large sample size enables us to pinpoint health information by the three ISP groups we have identified—children, elderly, and disparity groups (e.g., African-Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders). As an example, in 2013-2014, more than 48,000 Californians in each county were surveyed, including 3,484 households in Los Angeles County (3,350 adults and 660 children). Out of these households in LA County, we estimate that around 600 are below the poverty level, ~600 are African American and ~1,500 are Hispanic. Thus, although the sample sizes are not enormous for each disparity population, analysis of the CHIS can provide a window for health metrics for prevalent conditions and for the larger special populations – children, elderly, and some disparity populations (African-Americans and Hispanics).

Last updated September 1, 2016

Embedded Clinical Research and Innovation (ECRI) Unit

UCLA has established the ECRI unit to encapsulate experience from recent successful recruitment efforts that were embedded in clinical workflows within high volume clinical environments (e.g. a mammography unit, an ICU, and a nursing home). The ECRI team works together with clinical managers to develop communication materials, patient contact and consenting methods to minimize the impact on clinic workflow. For each study that they take on, the unit creates an implementation model and plan that is customizable to the project and is built around a lean concept, and that improves efficiency of the research study while creating little to no impact in a normal day to day high volume clinic. Support from the ECRI unit is prioritized for clinical trials and research studies that (1) are considered to be of high value to the health system (research results high likely to impact patient quality, efficiency, and care costs), and (2) must occur in busy and logistically challenging clinical environments that are likely to pose a barrier for conducting research.

The ECRI also develops new capacities for presenting research opportunities during clinical encounters. One approach will focus on the use of “best practice advisory” (BPA) alerts in the EHR. These alerts can be programmed to pop up messages that are either “passive” or “interruptive,” informing clinicians or research coordinators in real time when patients meet eligibility criteria. In addition, future interface enhancements to the CTMS – EHR interface will enable clinical trial eligibility criteria expressed in the CTMS to be transferred into the EHR to automatically create BPA triggering criteria. Similar clinical research alerts will also be used to warn clinicians if otherwise-eligible patients are about to be placed on a treatment that would make them ineligible for a trial, and to alert clinicians regarding eligibility for studies that are not represented in the CTMS, such as those that target prevention, self-management or lifestyle.

Last updated September 1, 2016

eMERGE

eMERGE is a national network organized and funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) that combines DNA biorepositories with electronic medical record (EMR) systems for large scale, high-throughput genetic research in support of implementing genomic medicine. eMERGE studies and pilots genomic medicine translation through discovery, implementation, tools, and policy. During Phase I and II, the Network deployed more than 40 electronic phenotype algorithms across more than 55,000 subjects with dense genomic data. Returning clinical results has been implemented or planned for pilot at sites across the Network. A large-scale survey of patient attitudes regarding data sharing is being sent to 90,000 clinic patients across the country.

A multicenter pilot of returning genome sequence information to electronic medical records (EMRs) for use in healthcare is almost complete. Themes of genomics, bioinformatics, genomic medicine, ethnics, data sharing, privacy, and community engagement are of particular relevance to eMERGE. eMERGE was initiated in 2007 and included five biorepositories linked to EMRs. The network demonstrated that EMR phenotyping to develop cohorts for genome-wide studies was a robust approach to genetic discovery, defined approaches for enhancing privacy of shared EMR data, and engaged patients and communities in consent and data sharing. eMERGE expanded to include 7 clinical sites in 2011 and 2 pediatric sites in 2012. eMERGE serves as an analytic tool and previous experience for Precision Medicine of innovation in this area.

Last updated September 1, 2016

GATK Best Practices

The GATK Best Practices workflows provide step-by-step recommendations for performing variant discovery analysis in high-throughput sequencing (HTS) data. They enable discovery of SNPs and small indels (no size limit in theory but adjustments may be required to call indels > 50 bp) in DNA and RNAseq. They do not yet enable discovery of structural variants (SVs) or copy number variants (CNVs). Although they were originally designed for human genome research, the GATK Best Practices are widely used (with adaptations as described in the documentation) for analysis of non-human organisms of all kinds, including non-diploids. The CTSI will develop a standardized pipeline for mapping and variant calling based on GATK’s “best practices” pipeline and validate this pipeline using variant calls obtained from the Human Longevity, Inc.

Last updated September 1, 2016

High Performance Computing

The high performance computing (HPC) organization within the UCLA Institute for Digital Research and Education (IDRE) has been supporting scientific computing on the UCLA campus since the early 1960s. Areas of specialization within IDRE include: multiprocessor/multicore/GPU programming; efficient algorithms for scientific computing; code optimization for using HPC resources and code clinics; scaling and analysis of parallel code; optimization of serial code; efficient serial and/or parallel algorithms use; parallelization or porting on different platforms; debugging; profiling; scientific visualization with large datasets; and grid/cloud computing. IDRE’s staff provides domain-specific support to facilitate computational and data specific requirements to ensure smooth integration with existing campus resources. IDRE is responsible for maintaining the campus research cyber-infrastructure including the Hoffman2 cluster, which is used to support the HPC computing in the Informatics Program’s efforts:
  • Hoffman2. UCLA’s Shared Hoffman2 Cluster has 64-bit nodes, currently 774 and 7,508 cores, with an Ethernet network and Infiniband interconnect, that includes a scheduler, GCC and the best performing compiler for C, C++, Fortran 77, 90 and 95 on the current Shared Cluster architecture, applications and software libraries that offer languages, compilers and software specific to Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Engineering, Mathematics, Visualization, Programming and an array of miscellaneous software. The current peak performance of the cluster is in order of 75 Trillion Floating Point, double precision, operations per second (TFLOPS). Hoffman2 is currently the largest and most powerful cluster in the University of California system. Hoffman2 additional resources for researchers include complete system administration for contributed cores, cluster access through a 10Gb network interconnect to the campus backbone, high performance home and scratch storage space, capability to run large parallel jobs that can take advantage of the cluster’s InfiniBand interconnect, and web access to the Hoffman2 Cluster through the UCLA Grid Portal, and access to the BlueArc and Panasas storage systems. The cluster is also an end point on Globus online service using 10Gb network interconnect backbone, thus providing researchers a facility for fast and reliable data movement between Hoffman2 and most leadership class facilities across USA..
  • Dawson2 Cluster. UCLA’s Dawson2 GPU CLuster, ranked 148 in the Top500, comprises 96 HP ProLiant SL390 G7 systems, each having dual socket Intel Xeon X5650 processors, 3 Nvidia M2070 Graphics processors, and 48 GB of main memory giving peak performance of 1.66 double precision Trillion Floating Point operations per second (TFLOPS). The cluster uses QDR Infiniband networking and 160 Terabytes of high performance common disk space from Panasas for communication and storage respectively.

Importantly, in 2015, the cloud storage program was deemed HIPAA-compliant, and is now permitted to store patient and biomedical research data. Working with the David Geffen School of Medicine and the UCLA Health System hospital, Hoffman2 nodes will also become HIPAA-compliant in the coming year (2016), providing a powerful platform for computationally-intensive (big data) clinical and translational research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

i2b2

The Informatics for Integrating Biology & the Bedside (i2b2) Cohort Discovery System contains data from over 4.5 million unique patients at UCLA. i2b2 is a secure online tool designed for UCLA investigators to conduct searches on clinical data from Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica UCLA Medical Center and other UCLA-affiliated clinics and departments. The search results provide a numeric count of patients that are based on de-identified data extracted from UCLA’s clinical data warehouse. Search criteria include demographics, diagnosis and procedure codes (ICD-9, ICD-10 and CPT), labs, medications, Area Deprivation Index (ADI), visit details (including site locations), vital signs and vital status.

Last updated January 9, 2017

Los Angeles Data Resource

Los Angeles Data Resource (LADR) is a joint project of major Los Angeles healthcare provider organizations, including UCLA, Cedars-Sinai (CSMC), Charles Drew University (CDU), USC, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and the City of Hope, aimed at enabling research that improves the health of all people in the region using data representing the continuum of care across the region’s major health systems. LADR allows investigators to conduct interactive searches across the participating organizations on patient demographics, diagnosis and procedure codes (ICD-9 and CPT), labs, and medications and will be available to you and your research team for recruitment purposes for your study. LADR formally launched in May 2014 with two organizations, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center (CSMC). Since then, Keck Medical Center of USC has also gone live, and investigators can now search a total of 8.6 million patient records. Researchers will also be able to query from City of Hope by spring 2016. Children’s Hospital Los Angeles and Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science have joined the LADR consortium and will become functional in the near future. LADR allows investigators to conduct interactive searches on demographics, diagnosis and procedure codes (ICD-9), labs, medications, vital signs and vital status.

Last updated January 9, 2017

REDCap

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REDCap
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REDCap

REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure, HIPAA compliant web-based application for quickly building and managing online surveys, data collection forms and databases. REDCap provides audit trails for tracking data manipulation and user activity, as well as automated export procedures for seamless data downloads to Excel, PDF, and common statistical packages (SPSS, SAS, Stata R).

Last updated January 9, 2017

University of California Research eXchange (UC ReX)

The University of California Research eXchange (UC ReX) is a joint activity of the 5 University of California (UC) CTSAs, charged with fostering multi-site clinical research by providing access to harmonized clinical data from the 5 health systems. The UC Rex Data Explorer is a secure online system designed to enable UC clinical investigators to identify potential research study cohorts spanning the five UC medical centers. The Data Explorer allows investigators to conduct interactive searches of data derived from patient care activities at Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco. Search criteria can include demographics, diagnosis and procedure codes (ICD-9, ICD-10 and CPT), labs, medications, visit details, vital signs and vital status. The output of each query from the UC ReX Data Explorer is a numeric count of patients by site that match the criteria identified in the query. The numeric count helps investigators assess the feasibility of their study idea by identifying whether there are sufficient numbers of prospective subjects within the UC system.

Last updated January 9, 2017

UCLA’s Integrated Clinical and Research Data Repository (xDR)

UCLA’s Integrated Clinical and Research Data Repository (xDR) is OHIA’s large scale clinical data warehouse that supports data analyses and extractions for research as well as analytics to support clinical quality management functions of the UCLA Health System. The xDR contains data derived from multiple clinical systems including a full copy of the CareConnect Clarity data warehouse, which is linked to disease registry data, other data from systems in Radiology, Pathology and other departments, and “legacy” data from older outpatient and hospital billing and managed care systems. The UCLA CTSI serves as the “storefront” for research access to xDR data.

Last updated January 9, 2017

UCLA administrative units

Clinical Trials Administrative Office (CTAO)

Clinical Trials conducted at UCLA under an industry-developed protocol or an investigator-developed protocol must have a contract in place with the industry sponsor. As soon as a Principal Investigator "PI" has decided to participate in a study the PI would submit the required paperwork to the Clinical Trials Administrative Office (CTAO). The CTAO negotiates all of these contracts. These studies are most often conducted in conjunction with obtaining new drug or device approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, under Phase I, II, III, or IV, although they can be designed with the sole purpose of collecting and analyzing data about approved drugs or devices in order to contribute to medical knowledge about the treatment of a disease or medical condition. Financial support for a clinical trial must be provided by a private entity, including pharmaceutical companies, interest groups, or charities. In all cases, the study must include the prospective enrollment of human subjects and the controlled testing of a drug, device, or diagnostic under an approved protocol. In the proposed WDP, CTAO will play a leading role in partnership with the four UCLA CTSI institutions to develop the Good Clinical Practice (GCP) for staff at all levels of the translational research enterprise. CTAO has already begun the development of material, “train the trainer” tools and a delivery platform for synchronous and asynchronous learning.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Conflict of Interest Review Committee (CIRC)

Conflict of Interest Review Committee (CIRC) is a peer review panel composed of faculty from a broad cross section of academic disciplines throughout campus. The CIRC is responsible for reviewing personal financial interests disclosed by UCLA researchers, making determinations about whether those outside financial interests constitute conflicts of interest, and making recommendations about how those conflicts of interest can be eliminated, reduced, or managed so that research awards can be accepted and work can commence. In this role, the CIRC serves as the substantive independent review committee required under the State of California Political Reform Act and as the “designated official(s)” required under federal policy/regulation on financial conflicts of interest related to research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Institutional BioSafety Committee (IBC)

The Institutional BioSafety Committee was established as the local review body responsible for oversight of all research activities – including teaching laboratories – involving the use of hazardous biological material and recombinant or synthetic nucleic acids, as required and outlined in the NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant or Synthetic Nucleic Acid Molecules and the CDC/NIH Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories (BMBL). The IBC is a faculty-led committee appointed by the UCLA Vice Chancellor for Research (VCR) and consists of experts in various fields, including biosafety, human gene therapy, infectious disease, recombinant DNA, animal containment, plant containment, and occupational health. The IBC is responsible for establishing, monitoring, and enforcing policies and procedures involving hazardous biological materials and recombinant/synthetic nucleic acids to meet applicable federal, state, local and institutional regulations and guidelines.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Office of Research Administration (ORA)

The primary role of the Office of Research Administration (ORA) is to provide the campus with professional guidance and administrative support for all sponsored research activities. ORA includes Contract and Grant Administration, Research Policy and Compliance, Extramural Fund Management, Human Research Protection Program, Animal Research Oversight, and Research Safety Committees. ORA maintains accurate records and administrative oversight of research projects and ensures proper administration of contracts and grants awarded to CTSI researchers at UCLA through the following mechanisms:

  • Office of Contract and Grant Administration (OCGA)
  • Office for the Protection for Research Subjects (OHRPP)
  • The Office of Intellectual Property and Industry Sponsored Research (OIP-ISR)
  • UCLA Academic Planning and Budget (APB)
  • UCLA Investigational Drug Pharmacy

Last updated September 1, 2016

Office of Contract and Grant Administration (OCGA)

Office of Contract and Grant Administration (OCGA) assists the campus research enterprise in the process of applying for, accepting, and administering contract and grant awards.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Office for the Protection for Research Subjects (OHRPP)

Office for the Protection for Research Subjects (OHRPP) is the administrative arm of the UCLA Human Research Protection Program (HRPP). The OHRPP in partnership with the research community is responsible for ensuring the safety and welfare of participants in Human Research Projects conducted under the aegis of UCLA. The OHRPP provides the campus and the five UCLA Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) with professional guidance and administrative support.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Office for the Protection for Research Subjects (OHRPP) and the NIH Single IRB Policy

At UCLA, the Office of the Human Research Protection Program (OHRPP) is the administrative arm of the UCLA Human Research Protection Program (HRPP). The OHRPP, in partnership with the research community, is responsible for ensuring the safety and welfare of participants in Human Research Projects conducted under the aegis of UCLA. The OHRPP, which is a Division within the Office of Research Administration, provides the campus and the five UCLA Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) with professional guidance and administrative support.

UCLA understands the importance of collaborative IRB review mechanisms in order to avoid duplicative reviews while still protecting the rights and welfare of human research participants. Through the OHRPP office, UCLA already has several IRB reliance agreements with other institutions, both to serve as an IRB of record and to rely on other IRBs. We also understand that NIH will be moving toward a mandatory Central IRB as of January, 2017. In the past 8 years, over 500 protocols have been reviewed under such arrangements. The webpage at http://ora.research.ucla.edu/OHRPP/Pages/ExternalIRBs.aspx describes many of our current reliance mechanisms.

UCLA’s continued commitment to such mechanisms was confirmed at the May 2013 meeting of its Human Research Policy Board. In attendance at that meeting, among other senior officials, were the Executive Vice Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor for Research, and the Associate Vice Chancellor for Research Administration.

Last updated February 22, 2017

Office of Intellectual Property and Industry Sponsored Research (OIP-ISR)

The Office of Intellectual Property and Industry Sponsored Reserarch (OIP-ISR) supports UCLA's research, education and service mission by:

  • Commercializing intellectual property rights; 
  • Facilitating collaborations with industry for next-generation scientific breakthroughs;
  • Advancing UCLA entrepreneurship and research; while
  • Protecting the university’s interests by managing risk; and
  • Promoting economic growth in California.

The scope of activities include:

  • Commercially evaluating new technologies;
  • Determining patentability and commercial value;
  • Prosecuting patents;
  • Marketing and licensing inventions;
  • Facilitating UCLA faculty startups;
  • Engaging industry to facilitate research collaboration;
  • Negotiating license agreements and Material Transfer Agreements; and
  • Receiving and distributing royalties and other income to the inventors, UCLA Campus and its Departments.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Academic Planning and Budget (APB)

Reporting to the Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer, the Office of Academic Planning and Budget (APB) supports UCLA executive management and campus-level strategic planning by providing objective, accurate, and timely data and analysis to inform central and unit decision making processes. It acts in an advisory role to the Chancellor and Executive Vice Chancellor/Provost in the allocation and administration of all campus funds. In addition, the office interacts with the Office of the President (OP) to ensure that the campus resource base and its flexibility are maximized and that the campus academic performance and programs are accurately characterized in system wide reports. Working with academic units, APB also plays a key role in providing guidance and support at the programmatic level. APB develops and maintains official campus data and statistics to generate institutional information and analyses used by the college, schools, and departments in program planning and resource management. Official institutional data are also provided to accrediting organizations, federal departments, the state legislatures, and ranking agencies as part of the accountability reporting schedule.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Institutional Review Boards (IRB)

UCLA has five campus IRB committees: Each of the five IRBs specialize in certain types of research. Studies are assigned based on the following:

The primary criteria is the Principal Investigator's home department (see descriptions of committees below); and also taken into consideration are the type of study based on the protocol's hypothesis or research question (social behavioral or biomedical) and the types of study procedures being used (see examples and notes below).

General description of each IRB:

  • North General IRB (NGIRB) reviews research from the College of Letters & Science and the Professional Schools.
  • South General IRB (SGIRB) reviews social-behavioral research from the Schools of Public Health, Nursing, and Medicine.
  • Medical IRB1 (MIRB1) reviews general and internal medicine, infectious diseases, and dental and ophthalmologic research.
  • Medical IRB2 (MIRB2) reviews oncology and hematology research.
  • Medical IRB3 (MIRB3) reviews neuroscience, neurology, psychiatric, drug abuse, and related behavioral science research.

Distinctions between biomedical and social behavioral research: 

  • Biomedical research. Biomedical research refers to the study of specific diseases and conditions (mental or physical), including detection, cause, prophylaxis, treatment and rehabilitation of persons; the design of methods, drugs and devices used to diagnose, support and maintain the individual during and after treatment for specific diseases or conditions; and/or the scientific investigation required to understand the underlying life processes which affect disease and human well-being, including such areas as cellular and molecular bases of diseases, genetics, immunology. This research is typically quantitative and not qualitative. Biomedical research is often patient-oriented and the research involves:
    • Studies of mechanisms of human disease
    • Studies of therapies or interventions for disease
    • Clinical trials (See Definition of Clinical Trials used for registering in ClinicalTrials.gov. See additional NIH definitions at About Clinical Trials on the NIH website for more details.
    • Studies to develop new technology related to disease 

  • Social-behavioral research. Social-behavioral research refers broadly to research that deals with human attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors and is often characterized by data collection methods such as questionnaires, interviews, focus groups, direct or participant observation, and non-invasive physical measurements. The research may be qualitative or quantitative. Social-behavioral research also includes epidemiological or outcomes research and health services research:
    • Epidemiological and behavioral studies: These types of studies examine the distribution of disease, the factors that affect health, and how people make health-related decisions.
    • Outcomes and health services research: These studies seek to identify the most effective and most efficient interventions, treatments, and services.

  • Important Notes. Social-behavioral studies that involve the use of drugs or devices, radiation and radiolabeled tracers, and other invasive procedures require review by a medical IRB. Retrospective and prospective medical chart reviews are assigned to the South General IRB. Prospective collection of biological specimens (e.g., blood, saliva) and/or collection of data via non-invasive measures (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging without the use of radiotracers, tests of sensory acuity, electrocardiography) that are usually considered clinical in nature may be reviewed by one of the general campus committees if:
    • The purpose of the research is primarily social-behavioral in nature;
    • The physiological interventions are sufficiently benign as to involve no more than minimal risk to subjects; and
    • The research otherwise fits the descriptions of one of the campus rather than medical committees.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Investigational Drug Pharmacy

Under the office of Human Research Protection Program, the UCLA Investigational Drug Pharmacy provides services and support to researchers to ensure that the handling of investigational or unlicensed drugs conforms to legal and regulatory requirements.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA hospitals and health system

CareConnect (EHR system)

CareConnect is UCLA's electronic health record (EHR) program. UCLA’s implementation of the Epic EHR system, is fully operational throughout the UCLA Health enterprise. All UCLA Health clinicians are required to conduct documentation, clinical charge capture, and all order management, including prescribing, through CareConnect. CareConnect includes instances of both of Epic’s data warehouse products, Clarity and Cogito Data Warehouse. These data systems are maintained by UCLA Health’s Office of Health Informatics and Analytics (OHIA), which supports analytical services for Health System management as well as providing the infrastructure for research access to data generated from patient care at UCLA.

The system integrates functions of approximately 65 software applications into a single system accessible across the health system and is available around-the-clock to clinical faculty and staff members. Services include scheduling, registration, referrals, and authorizations for UCLA managed care members at all clinics, clinical applications - pharmacy, Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE), documentation, radiology, rounding lists - at all hospitals, Computerized Provider Order Entry (CPOE) and documentation at a group of clinics and procedure areas in our hospitals (Wave 0), and CareConnect Lite as a replacement for cView at all clinics.

An estimated 18,000 faculty and staff members use CareConnect, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, advanced-practice nurses, other clinicians, trainees, students, and staff members working with scheduling, registration, billing, patient placement (ADT), and hospital information management (HIM). The CareConnect program is led by a team with expertise in EHR implementation and deep institutional knowledge of our health system. The CareConnect program is overseen by an Executive Oversight Board composed of leaders from UCLA Health System and David Geffen School of Medicine, which developed 11 principles to guide development and implementation of CareConnect.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center draws on a catchment area of about 3 million residents, 550,000 of whom are below the poverty level, and is actively involved in teaching 50% of all UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine medical students. The Research Institute supports more than 1,000 research studies from active investigators in emerging infections, cancer, women’s health, male reproductive health, vaccine research, neonatology, autoimmune diseases, cardiology, neurosurgery, and genetics. Physician-scientists at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center have made major contributions to the advancement of medicine, including the modern cholesterol test, the newborn thyroid deficiency screening test now used for every U.S. newborn, a screening procedure for Tay-Sachs disease that has dramatically diminished the incidence rates nationwide and worldwide, and a genetically engineered enzyme replacement for mucopolysaccharidosis. Campus-wide centers have been funded with their administrative home at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, creating an expanded support base for promoting clinical and translational research. Current centers include the Emerging Infection Center, Perinatal Research Center, Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Center, Liu Center of Pulmonary Hypertension Research, Rehabilitation Clinical Trials Center, CT Reading Center, HIV Medicine Research Center, UCLA Center for Vaccine Research, and the Male Reproductive Center, which is a World Health Organization-collaborating center for research in reproduction and a NICHD-funded contraceptive clinical trial network center.

Harbor-UCLA Medical Center was established in 1946 as the Harbor General Hospital, a new hospital facility was completed in 1963, and a new emergency department and operating room complex are currently under construction. The main building is an eight story hospital licensed for 553 beds. The facility maintains separate neonatal, pediatric, cardiac, surgical, medical, and neurosurgical intensive care units. The total clinical research space available at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center is 25,000 square feet. Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, in partnership with California State University Dominguez Hills, has trained underrepresented students in biomedical research. These NIGMS-funded programs pair underrepresented undergraduate and master’s-level students in biology with well-funded mentors at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Many of these students have since applied and been admitted to PhD programs throughout the country.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Information Services & Solutions (ISS) 

Information Services & Solutions (ISS) develops and maintains the central technology infrastructure and provides services and applications to over 20,000 people comprising UCLA Health, Practice Group and School of Medicine. We are committed to delivering progressive technology solutions that effectively support the patient care, research, and teaching missions of the Health Sciences and offer an increasingly integrated set of computing and communication services. We serve more than a fixed collection of hospitals, clinics, classrooms, labs, and offices, and strive to bring UCLA expertise to the community by participating in health exchanges and investing in technologies that shorten distances between people such as real-time access to information, telemedicine services, and web based access to resources.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA

Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA is a children’s "hospital-within-a-hospital" located on the third and fifth floors of Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center is a world renowned tertiary care medical center. Mattel Children’s Hospital UCLA is consistently ranked as one of the best children’s hospitals in the nation by the US News & World Report. Annually Mattel Children’s Hospital serves more than 6,000 inpatients and 40,000 outpatients. Pediatric care is also available in the community setting via The Mattel Children’s Unit at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, which includes a 26-bed Pediatric Unit, a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and a 16-bassinet Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. In total Mattel Children’s Hospital has 146 inpatient beds, including a 22-bed Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and a 48-bed, level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The outpatient Children's Health Center, located adjacent to the hospital at 200 UCLA Medical Plaza, serves more than 42,000 patients each year, and includes an 8-bed procedure area, and 25 patient rooms as well as the availability of laboratory, radiology, and pharmacy services.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital

The 217-bed hospital and its specialty clinics offer a full range of inpatient and outpatient services in mental health and developmental disabilities. Research programs at the Neuropsychiatric Institute enable the staff to develop and apply the newest and most appropriate therapeutic methods. The institute also conducts educational programs at the undergraduate and postdoctoral level.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Pediatric Neuromuscular Disease Clinic (a UCLA Hospital Clinic)

The Pediatric Neuromuscular Disease Clinic meets twice a month and the majority of patients seen are B/DMD. Additional patients with SMA, myotonic dystrophy, congenital muscular dystrophy are seen on select clinic days. The clinic can accommodate 12 patients in a day for multidisciplinary visits. Due to demand, some clinics have more patients especially those who do not need to see all team members on that day. Most B/DMD patients are seen 2 times per year for routine care and more frequently when needed. The appointments are generally scheduled months in advance, but patients can be scheduled on short notice. Physicians available in the multidisciplinary clinic include medical specialists (neurology, genetics, cardiology) - board certified pediatricians, neurologists, neurology fellows (4 per year who rotate in clinic- some fellows are pediatric neurologists or have specialization in physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) in addition to specialty training in neuromuscular disease), and pediatric and adult neurology residents. The clinic is able to serve both adult and pediatric patients and Dr. Perry Shieh is fully credentialed to provide specialist services to both children and adults. Older patients who need fewer of the child related services (i.e. Child-life specialist) are seen in multidisciplinary clinic or on another day depending on insurance coverage and needs. Drs. Stan Nelson and Nancy Halnon are both board certified pediatricians who can evaluate for disease or treatment related complications and manage steroid dependent patients in conjunction with primary care physicians.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center (RRUMC)

As the primary teaching hospital for the David Geffen School of Medicine, the 520-bed, 1,000,000 square foot medical center provides patient care in nearly all medical specialties. The medical center operates on a nonprofit, self- supporting basis. It is rated as one of the top three hospitals in the United States and is the top hospital on the West Coast according to US News & World Report.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital

Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital is an acute-care medical center that has served the healthcare needs of West Los Angeles and Santa Monica since 1926. One of the two hospital campuses of UCLA Health System, it features outstanding clinical programs that include its women's and children's services, emergency services and family medicine programs. Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital also is the inpatient home of the U.S. News & World Report No. 1-ranked UCLA Geriatrics Program.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Compliance Program

The UCLA Health Sciences Office of Compliance Services is responsible for ensuring that both health research and patient care activities at UCLA comply with all applicable laws and regulations, including health data privacy and security rules. The Compliance Program has been developed in the context of our core teaching, research, patient care, and public service missions. The specific purposes of the program are to:

  • Maintain and enhance quality of care
  • Demonstrate sincere, ongoing efforts to comply with all applicable laws
  • Revise and clarify current policies and procedures in order to enhance compliance
  • Enhance communications with governmental entities with respect to compliance activities
  • Empower all responsible parties to prevent, detect, and resolve conduct that does not conform with applicable laws, regulations and the program; and
  • Establish mechanisms for employees to raise concerns about compliance issues and ensure that those concerns are appropriately addressed.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Dental Center

Convenient, comprehensive dental care for people of all ages is offered at the UCLA Dental Center by faculty dentists and dental students working under faculty supervision. Specialized care is available in children’s dentistry, endodontics, radiology; oral and maxillofacial surgery; orthodontics, periodontics and prosthodontics (fixed and removable). Other programs include the dental school’s pain management center, dental fear and anxiety program and center for esthetic dentistry.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Health System

UCLA Health is a self-supporting nonprofit organization, owned and operated by the Regents of the University of California, to support the clinical activities of the professional schools of dentistry, medicine, nursing and public health. It is comprised of four hospitals: the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center (520 beds), the Mattel Children’s Hospital (520 beds), the Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA (75 beds), and the Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center and Orthopaedic Hospital (271 beds). The Westwood campus also includes the Jules Stein Eye Institute and Doris Stein Eye Research Center, the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior Neuropsychiatric Institute, and the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of 39 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer centers. Outpatient facilities include: a six-story, 380,000-square-foot ambulatory care center housing the Family Health Center for primary care of routine illnesses; the Children's Health Center; Internal Medicine clinics; a Surgery Center; and a 104,000-square-foot building housing the outpatient, training and research programs of the Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital and the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. This building also houses the UCLA Medical Center rehabilitation program. The UCLA Health System has a staff of more than 2,000 physicians, including 1,500 full time physicians employed at Ronald Regan UCLA Medical Center. The Ronald Regan UCLA Medical Center employs 2,500 support staff. UCLA Health System hospitals and clinics have over 1 million annual patient visits and 80,000 hospital admissions annually. With such a large population catchment, UCLA’s CTSI is poised to once again be able to capitalize on the large patient population, provide translational ideas that improve patient care directly at the source, and continue to leverage its close proximity to the Health System for seamless and integrated clinical research.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Medical Plaza

Located next to the Ronald Reagan UCLA medical center, UCLA Medical Plaza offers an accessible, friendly environment for a broad range of outpatient services, including more than 80 specialty clinics. The plaza is composed of the following facilities:

  • 100 Medical Plaza, a 140,000 square foot facility, provides space for approximately 100 physicians who are currently members or are eligible to become members of the clinical faculty of the School of Medicine. The building is owned and operated by a private firm under a long-term ground lease from the Regents of the University of California. It is the first facility of its kind to be privately developed, financed and operated on a UC campus.
  • 200 Medical Plaza, a six-story, 380,000-square-foot outpatient care center, house virtually all of UCLA Medical Center’s outpatient services. It offers a complete range of services, from a Family Health Center offering primary care for routine illnesses, to clinics providing stat-of-the-art outpatient treatments for complex cancers. The facilities in the Surgery Center enable patients to go home the same day following many types of surgical procedures.
  • 300 Medical Plaza, a 104,000-square-foot building on the southern end of the plaza, houses outpatient and training programs of the Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital, as well as the medical center’s rehabilitation program.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA Psychiatry Facilities

Adult patients meeting DSM-V criteria for major depression, post -traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, borderline personality disorder, pain disorders, addiction disorders, and associated disorders resulting from traumatic brain injury will be recruited from clinical programs at UCLA or the Greater Los Angeles VA Health System. They will have been identified through specialty behavioral health clinics administered and staffed by faculty of the Stewart and Lynda Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital within RRUMC. Additional facilities include the behavioral health outpatient clinics and partial hospital program administered through the UCLA Neuropsychiatric and Behavioral Health Service Practice located close to hospital and research facilities. Treatment centers include neuromodulation programs in Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT, Vagus Nerve Stimulation, Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Deep Brain Stimulation) which provide important access to the study population for inclusion and ensure successful ascertainment of study participants.

Last updated September 1, 2016

VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VAGLAHS)

VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System (VAGLAHS) is the largest and most complex healthcare system within the Department of Veterans Affairs and serves over 1.4 million veterans in the greater Los Angeles area. It is a a Joint Commission accredited, complexity level 1a facility serving Veterans throughout Kern, Los Angeles, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and Ventura counties. Outpatient clinics are located in: Gardena, San Gabriel, San Luis Obispo, East Los Angeles, Lancaster, Oxnard, Santa Maria, and Santa Barbara. VAGLAHS is a part of VA Network 22, which includes facilities in Los Angeles, Long Beach, San Diego, Loma Linda, and Las Vegas, Nevada.

Last updated September 1, 2016

UCLA schools, departments, institutes and centers

Advanced Heart Failure Research Laboratory

The laboratory is fully equipped and supplied for molecular biology experimentation. Major Equipment in the lab includes Bench-top refrigerated Allegra centrifuge (Beckman); Microcentrifuge (Fisher); Refrigerator: 4 and -20 degrees (Kenmore), -80 degrees freezer (Revco), rotating platform system incubator (Modern biology) and water purification system (Millipore). General computation and informatics resources: include New PC systems, (Dell Optiplex). Multipurpose work stations printer, scanner and FAX machine. General software: Word-processing software, spread-sheet applications and statistical programs. Webconferencing systems are available for webinars. High Performance computation and specialized informatics: An ~80 sq ft office houses 2 computers used in this analysis. One is used as the repository for protected data and initial analysis by all the lab members, with Genespring and Avadis installed locally under Windows XP Professional, and connected to the UCLA Department of Medicine network with the highest standard of secured assured by the UCLA Department of Medicine Information Technology Services. The other is a MacBook Pro 2GHz Intel Core i7 running OS X version 10.6.8 with 8 GB RAM, used as the main algorithmic development platform, and which is used to remotely connect to both the local analysis machine as well as the Hoffman2 parallel computing cluster operated by Academic Technology Services in the Mathematical Sciences building at UCLA. The programs necessary to conduct the analysis proposed in this proposal, including R, MATLAB, and Mathematica, are all licensed and operational on the Hoffman2 cluster, and entirely capable of the proposed large scale computations. The Shared Hoffman2 Cluster is being used by the investigators. It is organized into several component clusters that have been optimized for different research needs. The components include: the Campus General Purpose Cluster and the Research Shared Virtual Cluster made up from Base cores provided by ATS/IDRE and Contributed cores provided by researchers. The Research Virtual Shared Cluster is made up from Contributed cores purchased by individual research groups and Base cores purchased by IDRE to augment the Contributed cores. The research group is guaranteed use of the number of cores contributed with the ability to use surplus cores from the entire Hoffman2 Cluster. Complete system administration for contributed cores is provided, cluster access through a 10Gb network interconnect to the campus backbone, high performance home and scratch storage space, a dedicated data center facility for housing the cluster.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Bioinformatics Interdepartmental Program (IDP)

The Bioinformatics IDP offers integrated doctoral training for students interested in working at the interface of computer science, biology, and mathematics to address the fundamental challenges of contemporary genomic-scale research. This interdisciplinary PhD program consists of an integrated one-year core curriculum, research rotations, over 50 elective courses, and faculty mentors spanning biology, mathematics, engineering, and medicine. UCLA has a strong record of bioinformatics research and graduate training. In 1999 the faculty established a graduate core curriculum in bioinformatics, which has been offered continuously since that time, and recently has been greatly expanded, demonstrating the faculty’s commitment to collaborative teaching and to long-term development of an integrated bioinformatics program. These initiatives have been recognized by a large number of awards of multi-investigator Project and Training grants in bioinformatics from NIH, NSF, DOE and other funding sources. The program involves over 45 core bioinformatics faculty leading research in a number of genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, and other key areas. The Bioinformatics interdepartmental program (IDP) is the home for the Master’s track in biomedical informatics.

Last updated September 1, 2016

Biosciences PhD programs at UCLA

Graduate Programs in Bioscience is a consortium of 10 home areas and their affiliated Ph.D. programs, organized to provide the best possible research training and professional development for graduate students pursuing Ph.D.s in the life and biomedical sciences. Each interdepartmental Home Area is aligned with a Ph.D.-granting program, provides in-depth, cutting-edge training, and offers access to a wide variety of exceptional faculty mentors. Home Areas break down conventional institutional divisions and serve as a nexus for inquiry, training, and discovery in research themes where UCLA faculty members are leaders.

  • Programs in the Biosciences include:

      • Bioinformatics
      • Human Genetics
      • Molecular & Medical Pharmacology
      • Molecular Biology
      • Molecular, Cellular and Integrative Physiology
      • Neuroscience
      • Physics & Biology in Medicine
    • Last updated September 1, 2016

      California Center for Population Research (CCPR)

      The California Center for Population Research (CCPR) is an established UCLA-wide center designed to support demographic research on the UCLA campus and to foster the growth of the demographic research community. CCPR is one of the 12 national population research centers funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. The Center includes distinguished researchers in Sociology, Economics, Public Health, Public Policy, Geography, and Medicine. CCPR includes three cores: the Administrative Core that provides overall management of the Center and administrative support for grant proposals and grants management; the Information Core that provides extensive information services, including expanding the digital and print resources available to UCLA demographic researchers and an extensive data archive; and the Computing Core that provides computing support for CCPR member research projects. The CCPR sponsors a regular research seminar series, which includes speakers from a broad range of disciplines. Research interests of CCPR-affiliated faculty and staff include social and racial stratification, immigration and residential segregation, social mobility and health outcomes, and the effects of public programs (e.g., Medicaid, Medicare, TANF) in reducing the consequences of social disparities. CCPR researchers provide access to a wealth of experience in the measurement of social position, social disparities, discrimination, and participation in public assistance programs.

      The community becomes a classroom for undergraduate and graduate nursing students who work under faculty supervision in such settings as UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles County public health facilities, community mental health centers and a clinic in rural Chico, California. In addition, faculty and students provide comprehensive care at the UCLA School of Nursing Health Center at the Union Rescue Mission and the St. Francis Center in the Skid Row area of Los Angeles.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI)

      UCLA CNSI is an integrated research, education, and technology development center that bridges industry needs with academic innovations. The Institutes's mission is to encourage university collaboration with industry and to enable the rapid commercialization of discoveries in nanoscience and nanotechnology. CNSI aims for rapid translation of discoveries at the intersection of the life and physical sciences, engineering, and medicine. Educational programs offered span and target all educational and career levels from high-school student to science instructor. For instance, the Cross-disciplinary Scholars in Science & Technology (CSST) program offers international students to seek interdisciplinary education at UCLA.  The Entrepreneurship Forum events enable entrepreneurial UCLA faculty, staff and students to exchange ideas and build relationships within the LA entrepreneurial ecosystem. The Career Mentoring Session facilitates the interaction of graduate and postdoc students with faculty members to engage in career topics of broad interests. The CNSI 180,000-square-foot facility houses three floors of core facilities with an equipment inventory that includes state-of-the-art electron microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, X-ray diffraction microscopes, specialized optical microscopes, and highthroughput robotics for molecular screening; BSL3-level laboratory space; class 100 and 1000 clean rooms; shared wet and dry laboratory space for collaborative projects led by CNSI and other faculty; incubator space for start-up companies, a 260-seat theater; and fully outfitted conference rooms.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center on Biodemography and Population Health (CBPH)

      The Center on Biodemography and Population Health (CBPH) is a joint center between USC and UCLA. The primary purpose of the CBPH is to support pilot projects and on-going bio-demographic research that integrate epidemiological, medical, and biological information with the demographic perspective on population health; to train students in research methods and host workshops related to the biodemography of aging; to develop models of population health outcomes that will clarify the effects of changes in risk factors and interventions on population health and to disseminate results of Center work and integrate work from a network of related researchers and policy makers.

      Research supported by this Center should lead to a better understanding of: the effects of social, behavioral, biological, and medical factors on population health outcomes; the causes of observed racial, socioeconomic, and gender differences in population health in later life; the interdependence of health outcomes including chronic diseases, functioning changes, disability and mortality; potential changes in the future rates of disease and functioning problems in the aging population.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research

      The Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research is a joint program of the Fielding School of Public Health and the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA. Since its inception in 1976, the Center has been nationally and internationally recognized for its pioneering work in cancer prevention and control research. NCI-designated Cancer Centers are a major source of discovery of the nature of cancer and of the development of more effective approaches to cancer prevention, diagnosis and therapy. They also deliver medical advances to patients and their families, educate health-care professionals and the public and reach out to underserved populations. They are characterized by: strong organizational capabilities; institutional commitment; trans-disciplinary, cancer-focused science; experienced scientific and administrative leadership and state-of-the-art cancer research and patient care facilities. The Center conducts rigorous peer-reviewed research in three major areas. The Healthy and At-Risk Populations Program focuses on the prevention and early detection aspects of the cancer control continuum, with a major emphasis on cancer disparities research. The Patients and Survivors Program has as its major goal the reduction in avoidable morbidity and mortality among patients with cancer, long-term survivors of cancer. The two main scientific thrusts of the program are quality-of-life outcomes along the developmental phases of the life span continuum; and quality of cancer care, its measurement and evaluation. The program also houses the UCLA-LIVESTRONG Survivorship Center of Excellence and the UCLA Family Cancer Registry. The Molecular Epidemiology Program focuses on both primary and secondary prevention.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (CDMD) at UCLA

      The Center for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (CDMD) at UCLA supports Duchenne-related muscular dystrophy translational research and clinical care at UCLA. Key missions include identifying additional disease modifying drug targets, performing intelligent drug design, improving access and care in the clinical setting, and increase clinical trial participation. The CDMD performs outreach in Southern California holding educational events for the scientific community and the lay public and nationwide through its website, including publicizing clinical trial opportunities for patients with Becker or Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities

      The Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities is a multidisciplinary, community-focused research, policy, and training center at UCLA. Established in 1996, we are a joint effort of the David Geffen School of Medicine Department of Pediatrics and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. The Center also includes faculty from the UCLA Luskin School of Public Policy & Social Research, School of Law, and the College of Letters and Sciences. Integrating expertise across disciplines ensures that the solutions the center develops are theoretically sound and highly practical. Our unique method unites pediatricians, public health experts, psychologists, economists, lawyers, and policy experts with local families, communities, and businesses to: (i) Develop novel and responsive programs to improve children’s health; (ii) Increase the efficiency, effectiveness, and distribution of health and social services; (iii) Assist communities in transforming into healthier environments; and (iv) Turn data into information that can be used to make decisions and implement action. The center also partners with leading organizations across the country to create and spread forward-thinking ideas and strategies. The mission is to promote children's lifelong health, development, and well-being in the context of their families and communities. The center also creates and translates innovative ideas into optimal outcomes. Our work focuses on four areas: systems innovation and improvement, research and evaluation, training and model programs, and policy. In combination, these areas offer strategic, integrated techniques for transforming care and improving the long-term health of children and families.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Centers at UCLA Focused on Health Disparities and the Underserved

      Bridging Research, Innovation, Training, and Education (BRITE) Center for Minority Health Solutions

      Bridging Research, Innovation, Training, and Education (BRITE) Center for Minority Health Solutions is a multidisciplinary program to eliminate disparities in physical and mental health for communities that are traditionally underserved by academic research. The center consists of two integrated projects that deploy health technology to reach hard to reach populations and community and education cores.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Centers of Excellence in Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities, and Training (CDU/UCLA Project EXPORT)

      Project EXPORT’s mission is to establish the knowledge base necessary to reduce diabetes, depression and other related health disparities among low-income African Americans and Latinos. This center accomplishes its mission by bringing new vitality to the field of health disparities research via in-depth community participation alongside academia. The Project EXPORT team consists of physicians, researchers, and community leaders who are committed to serving large, impoverished minority communities. Project EXPORT is unique in its mutually beneficial partnership between Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU) faculty and researchers at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) David Geffen School of Medicine and Fielding School of Public Health — organizations that have nationally recognized research expertise and evaluation tools but often lack trusted ties with the community. The area of South Los Angeles, where CDU is located is characterized by some of the lowest educational attainment, family income and insurance coverage rates in the entire country. A key Project EXPORT goal is to address the dramatic health/education disparities among Los Angeles’ Latino and African American communities. Each summer, the brightest students from the UCLA’s David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Dentistry and School of Nursing apply for the opportunity for the TL1 Summer Fellowship in Health Disparities taught by faculty affiliated with Project EXPORT and featuring guest speakers from a variety of disciplines. The TL1 Program offers the students that are selected for the Summer Fellowship a stipend to work on a health disparities summer research project. At the end of summer, students present their findings at the annual UCLA Josiah Brown Poster Fair.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center for Health Advancement

      The Center for Health Advancement provides enhanced analysis and evidence based information to help policy makers decide which policies and programs can best improve health and reduce health disparities, in order to promote shared policy decision-making among well-informed voters, journalists, and politicians. Our Center is creating a comprehensive, evidence-based guide to what works for population well-being – like a Consumer Reports for health and social policy. Our goal is to make rigorous policy analysis fun to consume and easy to browse. Successes include a Center Study showing that cuts to after-school could impair the health of California’s poorest schoolchildren, which led to state legislators reinstating means testing to prioritize funding for poorer schools and students; information on economic and health disparities in affected communities from our study on transit alternatives for Wilshire Boulevard, which was included in LA County Metro in their final Environmental Impact Assessment for the Westside Subway Extension – a multi-billion dollar project spanning over a decade with the potential to transform transportation in Los Angeles; a Center Health Impact Assessment showing that free transit passes for students would help reduce truancy, which helped persuade the metro board not to increase youth fares in the recent fare adjustments; and population health projections from the Center’s Health Forecasting Model, which are now being used by hospitals throughout Southern California in their community benefit planning and reports to the IRS.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center for Vulnerable Populations

      The Center for Vulnerable Populations Research (CVPR) is a Nursing Center of Excellence in the United States. The CVPR, originally funded 1999 through 2009 by the National Institute of Nursing Research, an Institute within the National Institutes of Health. The mission of this "center of excellence" is to build and advance nursing and health science that enhances the strengths of communities to reduce/eliminate health disparities experienced by vulnerable populations. To this end, partnerships are established with communities through mutual definition of needs and identification of strengths and resources. Based on this assessment, interdisciplinary scientists, research participants, and community collaborators develop and implement research to eliminate health disparities. Research results are disseminated back to communities of researchers, participants, scholars, ethicists, and policy makers.

      The CVPR works to build the skills of researchers and community partners through consultation and educational activities. Educational activities include a summer institute on participatory research with communities, public colloquia on health topics of interest and workshops on how to conduct research utilizing participatory methods and community partnerships. Core services of the CVPR include training in participatory research methods and consultations on research methods, instrument development and statistics.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      L.A. Stroke Prevention /Intervention Research Program in Health Disparities (L.A. SPRIP)

      The Los Angeles Stroke Prevention/Intervention Research Program in Health Disparities (L.A. SPIRP) Project III: Implementing and Testing a Culturally-Tailored Stroke Risk Factor Reduction Intervention in Community Senior Centers is funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and administered by the Los Angeles Community Academic Partnership for Research in Aging (L.A.CAPRA) at UCLA. This program aims to reduce stroke risk levels among Korean American, Chinese American, African American, and Latino older adults by developing and implementing a culturally-tailored behavioral intervention (titled Worth the Walk) to increase physical activity (walking). Worth the Walk is a theoretically-grounded program based on evidence-based best practices. L.A. CAPRA will coordinate all aspects of community project management including interacting with the senior centers and the Community Action Boards above.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Los Angeles Community Academic Partnership for Research in Aging (L.A. CAPRA)

      The Los Angeles Community Academic Partnership for Research in Aging (L.A. CAPRA) is a collaboration between the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Charles Drew University, City of Los Angeles Department of Aging (DOA), Los Angeles County Community and Senior Services, and Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. L.A. CAPRA was created in 2010 with a grant from the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The special academic–community partnership is rooted in deep mutual respect and a shared vision for implementing and testing practical evidence-based interventions to empower older adults to stay as active and healthy as possible. With our interdisciplinary scientific team and vast network of community partners, L.A. CAPRA provides infrastructure to facilitate and implement community-partnered research across the (arguably) largest and most ethnically diverse urban center in the United States. With partner Multipurpose Senior Centers in every single council district (15) across Los Angeles – we have potential to reach 669,747 seniors aged sixty years and older with our innovative programs. L.A. CAPRA, in partnership with OAIC and RCMAR/CHIME, facilitates bi-directional collaborations between the CTSI and its community partners to conduct research to improve quality of life of minority seniors across LA. L.A. CAPRA maintains and active Community Action Board that vets and provides substantive input on academic research proposals to enhance their impact.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Minority Access to Research Careers (MARC) Branch

      Maximizing Access to Research Careers (MARC) Branch seeks to increase the number of highly-trained underrepresented biomedical and behavioral scientists in leadership positions to significantly impact the health-related research needs of the nation. Nationally, groups found to be underrepresented in biomedical and behavioral research include, but are not limited to, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, Alaska Natives and natives of the U.S. Pacific Islands. The MARC program is funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health. This honors program intends to prepare highly able minority students for graduate programs at outstanding universities throughout the United States. The MARC program pays for a portion of tuition and fees, provides stipends to undertake research projects in UCLA faculty labs during the academic year, provides stipends to undertake research projects at other universities during the summer, provides funding for conferences, and provides mentoring and preparation via honors courses, journal clubs and workshops. .

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Resource Center for Minority Aging Research's Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR-CHIME)

      The Resource Center for Minority Aging Research's Center for Health Improvement of Minority Elderly (RCMAR-CHIME) is a research and mentoring program that ultimately contributes to the reduction in health disparities for African Americans and Latinos by training and mentorship of minority junior-level faculty who advance their careers by conducting research on minority elders. The center includes a Training Program for post-doctoral fellows and junior faculty.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity

      The UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity (formerly named Center to Eliminate Health Disparities) focuses on eliminating disparities in incidence, prevalence, mortality and burden of disease experienced by disadvantaged and underserved populations. The Center concentrates on “keeping the public healthy” by targeting health promotion, disease prevention, and access to quality and timely care for all in need. The Center is a collaborative “center without walls” whose members include academic, government, foundation and private/non-profit investigators. Targeting the underserved, the Center promotes population-based intervention approaches to health promotion and disease prevention and control. In addition, it explores barriers preventing more effective collaboration with local health departments and other key partners engaged in the practice of public health. Officially launched in October of 2004, the Center aims to advance the understanding of health disparities across the lifespan and foster multidisciplinary research to improve the health of underserved communities. With a primary focus on Los Angeles County, and a secondary focus on surrounding counties, the Center facilitates community and academic partnerships in research, trains new investigators in health disparities research, and assists community partners in implementing effective health disparity reduction programs.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      UCLA-CDU Cancer Center Partnership to Eliminate Cancer Health Disparities

      The partnership between UCLA Jonsson Cancer Center and Charles Drew University (CDU) seeks to “Eliminate Cancer Health Disparities in Minority and Underserved Populations”. The Division of Cancer research and Training at CDU and the JCCC have partnered on research projects for many years. The current partnership is funded by a multi-million dollar U54 grant through the National Cancer Institute for the years 2009-2014. The overarching goals of the CDU-UCLA Cancer Partnership Program are to significantly increase the number of minority scientists in cancer research and to enhance the cancer outreach programs at CDU to address significant disparities in cancer among minority populations. The program components are 1) research projects; 2) the mentoring of students and junior investigators; 3) the training seminar series; 4) enhance CDU’s integrated clinical and tissue biorepository database on minority subjects; 5) enhance community participation; 6) improve clinical trials; and 7) increase faculty recruitment.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      UCLA-RAND Prevention Research Center

      The UCLA-RAND Prevention Research Center was created in 1998 as a Prevention Research Center by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The mission of the UCLA Prevention Research Center is to engage in health promotion and disease prevention research, training, and dissemination activities that: (i) Address the health needs of individuals and communities across the lifespan, with a focus on undeserved and minority populations; (ii) Build empowering relationships with partners in Los Angeles and beyond; and (iii) Directly benefit communities and/or transform local, state, and national policies. It is the vision of the UCLA Prevention Research Center to address needs across the lifespan by bringing together the expertise and experience of multidisciplinary faculty and staff from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, the UCLA Department of Pediatrics, and the Los Angeles County Departments of Public Health and Health Services. Together, we endeavor to engage in applied public health prevention research that addresses environmental, system-wide, and behavioral intervention solutions and strategies that address disease and disability. Our efforts include partnerships with key community stakeholders and organizations in order to develop relationships that foster the communication and trust requisite to meet the needs of the target population and have support to ensure sustainability. In addition, we value health equity and strive to implement evidence- and practice-based strategies in the diverse underserved and minority populations living in Los Angeles. The lessons we learn from working with these unique and sometimes vulnerable populations will allow us to disseminate findings more broadly and provide leadership and guidance in health promotion and disease prevention throughout the state of California and nationally.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      UCLA-USC Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD)

      The UCLA-USC Center for Population Health and Health Disparities (CPHHD) focuses on reducing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among Latinos in East Los Angeles, California (East L.A.). East L.A. is an urban community with high rates of obesity-related chronic diseases, including heart disease, diabetes, hypertension and stroke. East L.A. is over 96 percent Latino; 85 percent have Mexican ancestry, with the rest originating from Central America. The aims of our Center are to: (i) Provide an interdisciplinary, multilayered approach to reduce CVD risk in East L.A; (ii) Build on collective expertise and experiences to create innovative, interdisciplinary community and environmentally focused interventions and research questions regarding Latino CVD disparities; (iii) Organize Center projects that complement and interact with each other to provide a supportive and productive research environment; (iv) Implement interventions that have environmental prongs and potential sustainability; and (v) Build long-term capacity and contribute to local and national efforts to reduce and eliminate CVD disparities in high-risk Latino families.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute (CDI)

      The Children’s Discovery and Innovation Institute (CDI) was founded to enhance the culture for innovation and groundbreaking collaborative research spanning from molecule to community. The goal of CDI is to connect all research and training activities related to improving Children’s Health, spanning from discoveries at the bench through translation to the bedside to rolling out to community practice through collaborations and networks established locally, nationally, and globally. The UCLA CDI, founded to transform children’s health and healthcare in the United States and around the globe, will drive multidisciplinary collaboration among faculty and ensure groundbreaking discoveries for children. The Institute pioneers advancements in pediatric medicine in four core areas of research: brain, behavior and development; nutrition, metabolism, and growth; cancer and regeneration; and infection, inflammation, and immunity. Each of these areas focuses on prevention, screening, treatment and training opportunities for the next generation of pediatricians. A mentorship program in the four primary research areas enables younger physicians and scientists to learn from UCLA’s world-class experts in pediatric medicine and collaboratively related disciplines.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Clinical Research Capability and Infrastructure

      The UCLA Center for the Health Sciences (CHS), which includes nearly all of the university’s patient care, clinical education and biomedical research facilities, has achieved an international reputation for its health care programs and scientific advancements. Contained within the CHS are the professional schools of dentistry, medicine, nursing and public health; the UCLA Medical Center; UCLA Medical Plaza; the Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital; the Jules Stein Eye Institute and the Doris Stein Eye Research Center; the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center; the Gordon and Virginia MacDonald Medical Research Laboratories; and an extensive network of research institutes.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      The Collaboratory

      The Collaboratory is a central component of the Institute for Quantitative & Computational Biosciences (QCB) that provides the experimental and empirical research environment where bioscientists and computational scientists work together to design systems and conduct experiments to improve our understanding of biological systems. As large-scale data analysis is often limited in most bioscience laboratories, the Collaboratory’s main mission is to facilitate genomic data analysis by bringing together UCLA bioscience faculty with QCB faculty and a select group of QCB post-doctoral fellows dedicated to the Collaboratory. Individual post-doctoral fellows are assigned to work on specific bioscience research projects to develop tailored methodologies for genomic analysis. The post-doctoral fellows are responsible for organizing intensive tutorials to train UCLA students and postdocs in the latest next-generation sequence analysis techniques. In addition to providing computational expertise to bioscience researchers at UCLA, the Collaboratory has also set up and maintains a next-generation sequence data analysis server, and develops methodologies to process new types of data. QCB and the Collaboratory are research and computational resources leveraged by the Bioinformatics IDP, and support the cross-cutting nature of training proposed in the TL1 and its biomedical informatics track.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging at UCLA

      The Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging brings together faculty, students, and staff with a variety of backgrounds - physics, mathematics, engineering, biology, chemistry, and medicine - to pursue innovative technologies and science to accelerate our understanding of biology and medicine. Innovative technology programs, linked by systems biology, microfluidics, nanotechnology, and molecular imaging, provide the tools to conduct integrated science in a unique, interdisciplinary setting. With an initial focus on cancer and immunity, our goal is to develop new technologies to observe, measure, and understand biology in cells, tissues, and living organisms. Through molecular imaging - taking pictures of the living chemistry of cells and tissues of the body, we can watch biology in action in living organisms. The Crump Institute's ultimate objective is to provide medicine with new science and technologies to judge the state of health, and identify the early transitions to disease for the development and use of new therapies as part of the new era in molecular medicine.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Center of Cancer Prevention and Control Research

      The Center for Cancer Prevention and Control Research is a joint program of the School of Public Health and the Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA. Since its inception in 1976, the Center has been nationally and internationally recognized for its pioneering work in cancer prevention and control research. NCI-designated Cancer Centers are a major source of discovery of the nature of cancer and of the development of more effective approaches to cancer prevention, diagnosis and therapy. They also deliver medical advances to patients and their families, educate health-care professionals and the public and reach out to underserved populations. They are characterized by: strong organizational capabilities; institutional commitment; trans-disciplinary, cancer-focused science; experienced scientific and administrative leadership and state-of-the-art cancer research and patient care facilities. The Center conducts rigorous peer-reviewed research in three major areas: the Healthy and At-Risk Populations Program focuses on the prevention and early detection aspects of the cancer control continuum; the Patients and Survivors Program has as its major goal the reduction in avoidable morbidity and mortality among patients with cancer, long-term survivors of cancer; the Molecular Epidemiology Program focuses on: (1) Primary prevention: examining environmental exposure (smoking, diet, infection, air pollution, etc.) and genetic susceptibility and cancer risk, as well as exploring gene-environmental interactions in cancer risk; (2) Secondary prevention: evaluating biological markers (somatic mutations and hyper-methylations of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes, gene copy numbers, etc.) for early detection, as well as intermediate markers as surrogate end-points for chemoprevention; and (3) Tertiary prevention: assessing blood and tissue-based biological markers (tumor markers, SNPs, etc.) for cancer prognosis and survival prediction.

      Last updated September 1, 2016

      Division of Life Sciences, College of Letters and Science

      At the core of UCLA’s research programs, graduate training, and undergraduate instruction is UCLA College. The College's five divisions—Humanities, Physical Sciences, Social Sciences, Life Sciences, and Undergraduate Education—encompass 34 departments, 40 specialized programs, and 109 undergraduate majors and graduate degrees that span research and teaching in the liberal arts and sciences. 

      The Division of Life Sciences encompasses the study of all living systems, from the fundamental to the complex, including humans, animals and plants. UCLA Life Sciences’ interdisciplinary research and teaching are contributing to solutions to society's most urgent challenges in human physical and mental health, conservation of biodiversity, and production of food and biofuels. The division also is committed to creating a more representative demographic in the sciences and recruiting outstanding scientists—“mentor-professors”—with a specific focus on mentoring and motivating the full spectrum of UCLA’s student body. 

      The College hosts a number of research-related grants for undergraduates, many of which include seminars and round-table discussions relating to career opportunities and choice. For example, the Howard Hughes Undergraduate Research Program (HHURP), besides hosting weekly student led journal clubs and research presentations, also places a heavy emphasis on career counseling.

      Last updated May 13, 2015

      Graduate School of Education & Information Studies (GSE&IS)

      GSE&IS is committed to continuing research in the fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). The School consists of two academic departments: the Department of Education and the Department of Information Studies. The Department of Education's research is geared toward improving learning and teaching in the classroom, the workplace, and the home. The department is internationally known as a leader in the study of student testing and assessment, teacher and continuing education and development - particularly in urban, multi-ethnic environments, early childhood development, and issues of access, equity and quality facing higher education. The Department of Education was ranked sixth overall in the nation according to U.S. News & World Report's 2012 report. The Department of Information Studies is internationally recognized for research in areas such as digital archives and libraries, multimedia databases, social implications of the Internet, and organization of knowledge and information policy. Researchers focus on all kinds of environments where information is stored and retrieved, including the World Wide Web, museums, corporations, schools, universities, and public libraries. The Department of Information Studies was ranked 14th in U.S. News & World Report's last survey of Library and Information Studies graduate schools.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science

      Founded in 1945, the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science is recognized around the world as a leader in engineering education, research and service. UCLA Engineering has developed generations of rigorously trained engineers and has been the home for solutions to challenges in fields including energy, sustainability, healthcare, communications, transportation, infrastructure and information technology. The school is known as the birthplace of the Internet because in 1969 the very first transmission on what would become the Internet was sent from UCLA Engineering’s Boelter Hall. The school is also the birthplace of major innovations in reverse-osmosis technology for clean water, semiconductor design and development, pollution research and more. Our curriculum offers a hands-on, multidisciplinary education to prepare students to take on the challenges of our times and to make impacts in ways that we cannot yet imagine. Our proximity to the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and the UCLA Anderson School of Management allows us to excel in the growing field of biomedical and bioengineering research, as well as entrepreneurship. The talented and diverse faculty members at UCLA Engineering are among the top engineering educators and researchers in the world. Many of our affiliated faculty have been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, the highest distinction for engineers in the U.S., and have received numerous other awards.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Informatics Center for Neurogenetics and Neurogenomics (ICNN)

      ICNN is NIH-funded and co-directed by Dr. Giovanni Coppola, Dr. Eleazar Eskin and Dr. Nelson Freimer. Dr. Dan Geschwind is a co-investigator who was initiated in mid-2009 to augment the informatics needs of a neurogenetics program. It currently occupies approximately 300 square feet of dedicated office space in the Gonda research facility on the UCLA campus, adjacent to the UNGC genomics core and in close proximity to the laboratory of Drs. Coppola and Geschwind. Some ICNN staff members also have private/shared offices elsewhere in the Gonda building. The ICNN is funded by a Center Core grant from NINDS (5P30NS062691) which supports the provision of bioinformatics services (statistical genetics, sequence analysis, and gene expression analysis) to campus neuroscientists. ICNN staff has routine access to 1600 nodes in the ~12,000-core large genomics computing cluster of UCLA (Hoffman2 UCLA Cluster, http://www.ats.ucla.edu/clusters/hoffman2/, overseen by Dr. Eleazar Eskin), housed in dedicated space managed by the Institute of Digital Research and Education within the California Nanosystems Institute building, located in close proximity to the Gonda building. The ICNN office hosts up to eight computer workstations. One computing server (8 core, 64-bit, 3.1 GHz, 32GB RAM) and one data server (50 TB RAID) is in a separate server room also within the Gonda building. The workstations and servers are connected through a private subnet within the larger Gonda network. The ICNN has already established the analysis pipelines for gene-expression and statistical genetic study, as well as analysis pipelines for targeted and exome resequencing, ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data. The next-gen sequencing pipelines can analyze 1 billion (1000M) reads in few hours, using the full capacity of the above-mentioned sub-cluster. Databases include an online gene expression database (REPAIR), and a sequence variant database (AWEXOME), both of which were developed in the Geschwind lab and run on ICNN servers (see below, computer and database resources as well).

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Innovation Accelerator

      The Innovation Accelerator (IA) was founded in 2008 as the private side of a public-private partnership with the National Science Foundation. The IA's work in commercializing the NSF's SBIR portfolio was cited in the 2012 President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology report, according to which the IA levered $6M into $200M+ of private dollars into the NSF SBIR portfolio (a 33X return for our nation). The report also states that the IA has developed an important innovation model for our nation, and that it should be adopted across federal agencies. The mission of the Innovation Accelerator (IA) is to promote our nation's economic competitiveness in the global economy by promoting our nation's innovation. The IA is a vertically integrated innovation practice with a focus on commercialization, intellectual property, and venture capital. The CTSI will use this resource to advance training opportunities in entrepreneurship and assist scientists in commercializing their intellectual property.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Institute for Digital Research and Education (IDRE)

      The Institute for Digital Research and Education (IDRE) is a cooperative of faculty and technologists working to advance the existing body of computing knowledge and expertise at UCLA. An interdisciplinary research institute with an emphasis on the integration of high performance computing, applied algorithmic research and development, computer science, and informatics, IDRE is central to UCLA’s data science initiatives. IDRE supports research and innovative scholarship that takes advantage of new technologies and encourages collaboration between faculty from different departments and disciplines at UCLA, the opening of new research questions, and the enrichment of the learning environment. The goal of this campus-wide collective is to ensure UCLA’s reputation as a world leader in high-performance computing and visualization research and education. IDRE’s unique computational capability includes High Performance Computing resources and expertise, Grid and Cloud Access Services, Cluster Services, the Grid Portal, and UCLA’s data center system.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health

      Jonathan and Karin Fielding School of Public Health (SPH) consistently ranks among the top 10 schools of public health in the country by U.S. News & World Report. The school's distinguished faculty has more than 250 members of which 15 are members of the Institute of Medicine, more than 400 masters students and 230 doctoral students. The School houses five academic departments including Biostatistics, Community Health Services, Environmental Health Sciences, Epidemiology and Health Policy and Management. SPH also houses several highly productive interdisciplinary research centers and numerous NIH-funded scientists who participate in CTSI transdisciplinary team-based research. SPH centers include: the UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Policy Equity, the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, the Center for Health Policy Research, the Center for Adolescent Health Promotion, the Center for Environmental Genomics, the Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities, the Center for Global an Immigrant Health, the Center for Public health and Disasters, the Center for Metabolic Disease Prevention and the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control Research.

      Last updated August 2, 2015

      Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC)

      Founded in 1974, UCLA’s cancer center is officially designated by the National Cancer Institute as one of only 27 comprehensive cancer centers in the United States with exemplary programs across the broad spectrum of basic research, clinical investigations, patient care, and cancer control and prevention. Specialized outpatient care includes both surgical and medical oncology. NCI-designated Cancer Centers are a major source of discovery of the nature of cancer and of the development of more effective approaches to cancer prevention, diagnosis and therapy. They also deliver medical advances to patients and their families, educate health-care professionals and the public and reach out to underserved populations. They are characterized by: strong organizational capabilities; institutional commitment; trans-disciplinary, cancer-focused science; experienced scientific and administrative leadership and state-of-the-art cancer research and patient care facilities. JCCC has established an international reputation in a number of areas, such as developing new cancer therapies, providing the best in experimental and traditional treatment, and expertly guiding and training the next generation of medical researchers. Numerous successful targeted therapies were developed based on basic science done in UCLA laboratories and later clinical research with UCLA patients. A few of the more well-known therapies include: Herceptin, a targeted breast cancer drug and the first approved treatment that attacks cancer at its genetic roots; Gleevec, a once-a-day pill that targets a common form of adult leukemia called chronic myelogenous leukemia, or CML; Sprycel, also a pill that targets CML; Tarceva, a targeted lung cancer drug; Avastin, a targeted drug for colorectal cancer and lung cancer. These treatments are just the most well-known of our JCCC firsts.

      With a membership of more than 450 physicians and scientists, JCCC is one of the largest comprehensive cancer centers in the nation. JCCC handles more than 156,000 patient visits per year and conduct hundreds of clinical trials, providing the latest in experimental cancer treatments. Our depth lets us offer a wide array of benefits to patients.

      Last updated May 26, 2015

      Jules Stein Eye Institute

      With inpatient and outpatient services, operating rooms and extensive research facilities, the institute is a center for the treatment of eye disease, as well as research and education in the preservation of vision and the prevention of blindness. In Fall 1989, the Doris Stein Eye Research Center was dedicated. This facility accommodates expansion of programs associated with the Jules Stein Eye Institute and the Department of Ophthalmology at the School of Medicine.

      Last updated April 11, 2016

      Semel Center for Informatics and Personalized Genomics (SCIPeG)

      The Semel Center for Informatics and Personalized Genomics (SCIPeG), directed by Dr. Coppola, is located in the NPI building (adjacent to the Gonda Center) and comprises ~700 sq ft of office space, with 10 workstations for programmers and data analysts. The space is equipped with high-speed data ports and connection to the Semel server cabinet, as well as to the UCLA computational cluster (see above), greatly facilitating data transfer and computationally intensive analytical tasks. SCIPeG programmers develop and maintain a number of database and computational tools for high-throughput genetic and genomic data analysis, mining and storage, many of which already available to ICNN users.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Specialty Training and Advanced Research (STAR) Program

      The Specialty Training and Advanced Research (STAR) Program is a unique post-doctoral research-training program for the development of physician-scientists. Many clinical fellows are interested in pursuing a science career, but without prior formal training, they often lack the tools to be successful. Started in 1993, the STAR program was designed to fill this void in research training. STAR Fellows complete clinical training toward board certification while also pursuing a formal research degree. The program offers one of four research career tracks: 1) basic science PhD, 2) health services PhD, 3) Master of Science in Clinical Research in the UCLA CTSI Training Program in Translational Science (TPTS), and 4) postdoctoral research training for those who already have an MD PhD. By providing research training at the end of clinical training, trainees have better alignment of clinical and research interests and greater “momentum” as they transitioned to research faculty positions.2 Over the first 20 years of the program, there have been 123 graduates, of whom 80% (99/123) remained in a research position. Sixty graduates (49%) received career development awards, and 23 (19%) have so far received investigator-initiated NIH (R01) or equivalent grants. The outcomes of the STAR Program appear superior to that reported from clinician-scientists training programs. The UCLA STAR Program produces masters and doctoral science training for clinicians. In 2014, the STAR Program agreed to also fund fellows in the Department of Medicine interested in the biomedical informatics track, providing tuition support, administrative and graduate school assistance, and career development mentorship.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Anderson School of Management

      Established in 1935, UCLA Anderson School of Management provides management education to some 1,600 students enrolled in full-time, part-time and executive MBA programs and doctoral programs. UCLA’s Anderson School of Management offers both degree and non-degree programs to meet the diverse educational needs and professional goals of students. UCLA Anderson's rigorous programs offer exceptional academic preparation, a cooperative and congenial student culture, access to a thriving business community, as well as support services for scholastic and career advancement. Specialized centers support faculty research and sponsor courses, extracurricular activities, and conferences. They also provide varied opportunities for continuing education and contact among scholars, students, and industry leaders.

      Last updated May 13, 2015

      UCLA Business of Science Center

      The mission of the UCLA Business of Science Center is to prepare scientific, engineering, law, medical and business graduate students for careers in the private sector; to assist university faculty and clinicians in technology transfer; and to serve as a catalyst for increased industry support and involvement on campus. With this mission in mind, the Business of Science Center aims to foster a culture of innovation and will maximize the impact of UCLA research on society. The Business of Science Center helps faculty navigate a path to commercialization; supports academic inventors with interdisciplinary market research, competition identification, and intellectual property landscape, and more.

      Last updated August 2, 2015

      UCLA Center for Health Advancement

      The UCLA Center for Health Advancement produces knowledge that helps decision-makers in all sectors to formulate policies and programs that improve the health of all communities. The Center’s work focuses on how to replace wasteful expenditures with social investments that yield greater returns. The Center’s core expertise includes impact assessment, health forecasting, and modeling and analysis for inter-sectoral planning. The Center’s research collaborations support a broader understanding of how to improve the public’s health and health equity. By involving faculty from throughout the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health and across UCLA, the Center boasts extensive know-how, including expertise in non-health sectors, such as education, transportation, housing, environmental protection, community planning, agriculture, public welfare, and economics.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Center for Health Policy Research (CHPR)

      The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research is one of the nation's leading health policy research centers and the premier source of health policy information for California. The Center is the home of the California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) and is affiliated with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. The Center is a collaboration of dozens of leading health and health policy researchers from UCLA and beyond. Under the guidance of Gerald Kominski, PhD, as well as an executive leadership committee, the Center is able to draw on diverse backgrounds in public health, medicine, law, economics and social science to advance our understanding of health and health policy. The Center conducts research on a variety of national, state and local health policy issues, including health insurance, health care reform, health economics, health disparities and chronic disease.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Center for Health Services and Society

      UCLA Center for Health Services and Society’s mission is to strengthen resiliency and improve the mental health of local and national diverse populations through rigorous research, effective programs, and partnering with community-based and policy agencies. While we maintain a strong focus on improving preventive and treatment services for mental illnesses across the lifespan, we also explore broader societal issues, such as understanding the social and historical context for services and illness and building new strategies to promote community strength and resiliency through healthcare, media and communication, and the arts. The Center houses UCLA clinical faculty that includes adult psychiatrists and psychologists, child and geriatric psychiatry specialists, and staff, including doctoral level social scientists, master's level statisticians, and research and administrative staff.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC)

      UCLA Claude Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (OAIC) is an NIH/NIA funded center whose mission is to maintain and restore the independence of older persons. The UCLA Center's theme, "Preventing Disease and Disability in Vulnerable Populations: a Translational Approach" emphasizes research that extends across the full spectrum from T1 to T2 translational research. Within this theme, an important focus of the UCLA OAIC is on developing and understanding interventions that reduce inflammation. In the UCLA OAIC paradigm, basic biomedical research informs clinical research and clinical research informs basic biomedical research. Accordingly, the UCLA OAIC supports research that links these two types of research in both directions by 1) examining mechanisms underlying successful clinical interventions and 2) developing new basic science approaches that will lead to clinical interventions. In addition to this emphasis on T1 research, the UCLA OAIC has expanded its strategy and reach to include the second stage of translational research, T2. T2 research brings new knowledge into clinical practice and decision-making. The Center stimulates scientific discovery through 4 Research Cores (Recruitment and Retention-led by Dr. Sarkisian, Research Operations, Analysis and Cost-effectiveness, and Inflammatory Biology), a Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core, a Research Career Development Core, and a Leadership/Administrative Core. Research Cores provide 4 levels of support (consultation, short-term, ongoing, and partnership on new projects) for external projects and internal OAIC activities. The purpose of the Pilot and Exploratory Studies Core is to promote innovative basic and clinical research, conducted by collaborating teams of junior and senior investigators through pilots and exploratory studies that fall within the UCLA OAIC's research theme. The goal of the Research Career Development Core is to train junior faculty members to become future academic leaders in translational basic, clinical and health services research directed toward improving the independence of older persons. A related goal is to attract new faculty from various disciplines into aging research. The Career Development Award (CDA) program provides integrated training in translational mechanistic and outcomes research, and promotes faculty career development. CTSI has joint-funded the CDAs and pilot awards.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Clinical Genomics Center

      UCLA was the first or second academic center in the world to offer clinical-grade whole-exome sequencing, and we have now accrued an unparalleled experience of over four years and thousands of analyses. This clinical test, performed under strict CLIA-compliant clinical laboratory conditions, utilizes so-called “next-generation” or “massively parallel” DNA sequencing platforms to obtain full DNA sequence of all the protein-coding regions in the human genome, about 30 million nucleotides of genetic code comprising about 23,000 genes. The technique thus allows testing not only of the small subset of known genes associated with genetic disorders but also any and all other genes that might be involved or yet to be discovered. And all 23,000 genes are interrogated in parallel, in a single test, offering the chance to quickly put an end to the “diagnostic odyssey” that so many patients with mysterious presentations typically go through, taking many years, visits to countless specialists, and tens of thousands of dollars of laboratory testing and imaging.

      From the beginning, this service has been structured in a holistic fashion, with strong emphasis on interdisciplinary academic and clinical input. Every case is analyzed intensively by the unique “Genomics Data Board” that meets weekly and is comprised of the laboratory directors, bioinformaticists, clinical geneticists, pathologists, genetic counselors, clinical fellows and, whenever available, the ordering physicians. Only unanimously agreed-upon findings are reported out. While we are quite conservative in designating a DNA variant as causative (pathogenic), our overall diagnostic yield has been extremely high, about 25-50%; such a return is much higher than virtually any other genetic test. In addition, the test has yielded a number of new disease gene discoveries. We have reported this success in high-profile journals and at international meetings. Lastly, our group took an early leadership role in evaluating the need (or not) for routine confirmation by Sanger sequencing of variants detected next-generation sequencing, and in the important and rather heated discussions at the national level about reporting of incidental/off-target findings. Given our uniformly high coverage across the genome, it is unusual for our NGS findings to be at all ambiguous, but if there is the slightest concern about that, we have immediate access (just across the hall) to confirmation in our Orphan Disease Testing Center.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine

      The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA (DGSOM) is one of the top ten medical schools in the country. DGSOM engages the efforts of more than 2,000 full-time faculty and 1,000 active investigators, many recognized with the highest national and international awards and honors. UCLA constitutes a critical mass of outstanding research in all areas of basic, clinical, translational, and population-based research and is ranked eleventh in the United States in research funding from the NIH, with over 800 active research awards totaling more than $370 million. UCLA also has the fifth highest total research dollars, totaling nearly $1 billion annually. The School of Medicine education and training currently encompasses 1,300 residents, 750 medical students, and almost 400 graduate students working toward PhD degrees in health related sciences, with 438 active training and career development awards. There are now nearly 170 endowed chairs. UCLA has been ranked "Best in the West" by U.S. News and World Report's annual survey of the best hospitals in America for 25 consecutive years. The medical school is ranked eleventh in the country in research funding from the National Institutes of Health and third in the United States in research dollars from all sources.

      Last updated May 27, 2015

      UCLA Department of Human Genetics

      The UCLA Department of Human Genetics is the youngest basic science department in the Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. When the Department was launched just prior to the sequencing of the human genome, it was clear that the practice of genetics research would be forever changed by the infusion of massive amounts of new data. Organizing and making sense of this genomic data is one of the greatest scientific challenges ever faced by mankind. The knowledge generated will ultimately transform medicine through patient-specific treatments and prevention strategies. The Department is dedicated to turning the mountains of raw genetic data into a detailed understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of human disease. The key to such understanding is the realization that genes not only code for specific proteins, but they also control the temporal development and maturation of every living organism through a complex web of interactions. The department serves as a focal point for genetics research on the UCLA campus, with state of the art facilities for gene expression, sequencing, genotyping, and bioinformatics. In addition to its research mission, the Department offers many exciting training opportunities for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and medical residents.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Department of Medicine

      UCLA investigators are situated within the Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research (GIM/HSR) of the UCLA Department of Medicine, which includes over 100 faculty members, 20 of whom are clinician-investigators or full-time researchers with advanced degrees and training in health services research. All UCLA personnel have dedicated offices and research space co-located where much of the institution’s health services research is conducted and coordinated. The GIM/HSR division is equipped with all necessary support facilities including offices with secretarial and administrative support. The offices have full computer support including e-mail and network access so that collaboration within the institution and with Healthwise is facilitated. The research facilities include full capacity for copying, faxing, scanning and include meeting rooms with audio-visual facilities for organizational meetings. The computer systems include desktop or laptop computers for all employees as well as a high-capacity file server with off-site backup.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Department of Medicine Statistics Core (DOMStat)

      Analysts in the Core have expertise with a wide variety of statistical analysis software, including general libraries such as R, SAS and SPSS, and specialized modeling tools such as EQS, LISREL, Mplus, HLM, and many others. They also have expertise in developing networked (e.g., internet) database applications using tools such as REDCap, ASP.net, and scripting languages such as JavaScript and VBScript. Each analyst has a high-performance Dell workstation, with access to all of the software listed above plus tools such as Stat Transfer, nQuery Advisor, X-Win32 and PASS for power calculations. The DOMStat file server is located in the Department of Medicine server room, which has restricted access and daily automated backup of data. Network access is limited by Medical Center firewall and local network security policies. The DOMStat offices are co-located with the GIM/HSR division.

      Last updated August 2, 2015

      UCLA Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine

      The UCLA Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine assists doctors and patients in making optimal decisions based on the latest diagnostic studies, using state-of-the-art instrumentation. Each month, approximately 500,000 samples, including 10,000 biopsy and cytology cases, are analyzed to guide the care of patients in UCLA Health System, and through the department’s referral network regionally and nationally. Offices: The Pathology Laboratory and Office areas have a total square footage of 10,692 within CHOP. The number of routine surgical specimens received yearly are 16,817; the number of GI specimens received yearly are 10,214; the number of IHCs performed yearly are 9,194; the number of EMs performed yearly are 455. Staff: There are 5 full-time histotechnologists, 3 immunohistochemistry technologists, 1 electron microscopy technologist, 4 pathology assistants, 3 secretaries and 15 pathologists. Equipment: The Pathology Lab contains; 2-Leica-Biovison autostainer Bond III, Leica-Biovision autostainer Bondmax, 2-Shandon excelsior processor, 5-Slidemate slide printer, 2-Printmate cassette printer, 2-Unload station for Printmate cassette printer, Sakura Prisma stainer, Sakura Glas g2 coverslipper, Hacker coverslipper, Tissue Tek VIP5, 3-Microm HM550 VP-D Crytostat, Reichert Jung microtome 2030, Microm 335E microtome, 3-SRM 200 microtome, Leica RM2255 microtome, Leica Ultratome, Leica Ultratome- contol panel, EM transmission microscope, Leica EM tissue processor, Aperio slide scanner, Voicebrook dictation system, Digital X-ray machine, Shandon Cytospin 4, Fisher centrifuge. MRI Scanners– Included in the Department of Radiological Sciences’ capital equipment inventory are two Siemens 3.0 Tesla machine (Skyra and Prisma) and a 1.5 Tesla machine (TIM Avanto), each with 32 independent RF receiver channels, excellent gradient hardware (45mT/m or 80 mT/m gradient strength and 200 T/m/s gradient slewrates), and a full complement of pulse sequences and multi-channel RF receiver coils for MR imaging and proton spectroscopy. These systems are <30 meters from Dr. Ennis’s office in Medical Plaza 300. An additional research-only 3.0T Siemens Trio system is available in the nearby CHS building (~600 meters).

      In particular, the 3.0T MRI systems are excellent systems for performing cardiovascular MRI exams. The excellent field homogeneity of these systems combined with local gradient echo shimming permits the acquisition of high quality balanced steady-state free precession images with limited off-resonance banding artifacts within the region of interest when a patient specific gradient shim is used. The two-channel B1-transmit system improves B1-homogeneity and reduces SAR. Furthermore, the higher field strength (relative to our 1.5T system) permits the acquisition of phase contrast, perfusion, late gadolinium enhancement, magnetic resonance angiography, and motion encoded (DENSE or tagging) images with improved SNR efficiency. The 1.5T system is also available for use during these studies. Note that a 1.5T Avanto and 3.0T Trio are also available in the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center (~300m away).

      Last updated May 26, 2015

      UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research

      UCLA Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research (GIM & HSR) in the Department of Medicine of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA houses a full finance team to maintain this award, including personnel, accounting and purchasing functions. The GIM & HSR Division houses over 100 faculty and includes over 20 clinicians with advanced degrees and training in health services research. These individuals specialize in a wide variety of methods, including community partnered qualitative and quantitative methods, particularly when applied in a health disparities framework; including but not limited to the development, testing, and implementation of community based interventions designed to enhance the knowledge in the community about critically important risk factors and conditions such as kidney disease. Three dedicated statisticians are located in the division as well as a psychometrician and two health economists. In addition, this group works closely with the more than 60 clinicians in general internal medicine at UCLA and more than 350 clinicians throughout the Department of Medicine. These faculty also have close working relationships with economists, statisticians, social scientists and other specialists throughout the institution and at RAND. This year, division faculty have been awarded over $12,500,000 dollars of federal grant support.

      The GIM/HSR Division is equipped with all necessary support facilities including offices with secretarial and administrative support. The offices have full computer support including e-mail and network access so that collaboration within the institution and with our community partners is facilitated. The research facilities include full capacity for copying, faxing, and scanning and include meeting rooms with audio-visual facilities for organizational meetings. The computer systems include a full complement of pentium PCs as well as fully functional UNIX and SUN systems. The Division has a multimedia station that houses scanning, slide-making, LCD, and photo-reproduction equipment. CERP and TSP leaders comprise faculty members from GIM & HSR.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP)

      The Early Academic Outreach Program (EAOP) is an academic preparation program established in 1976 by the University of California to expand postsecondary education opportunities for California's educationally disadvantaged students. UCLA EAOP works with students to help them become competitively eligible applicants for college admission, going beyond minimum eligibility. EAOP works collaboratively with families, educators, schools, communities, and various campus departments to provide pre-college students with challenging academic enrichment activities to promote and cultivate a college-going culture. EAOP is one of the state's most successful pre-collegiate student academic development programs. UCLA EAOP works with over 15,000 students in middle school and high school each year. This includes working with over 80 schools in 10 school districts. Since 1991, approximately 60% of EAOP seniors meet UC eligibility each year, 82% attend a postsecondary institution upon high school graduation and 62% attend a 4-year institution, with 25% attending a UC school.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Healthcare Improvement Institute

      The Healthcare Improvement Institute offers multiple certificate-based programs to increase your ability to implement quality and lean improvement projects. In support of UCLA Health’s Vision and Mission, the Healthcare Improvement Institute was founded as a collaboration of Hospital Operations, the Department of Nursing, and the School of Medicine to increase QI and lean culture by providing a standard certificate-based QI & Lean curriculum aimed at empowering and engaging providers, staff and administration to serve as agents of change at UCLA Health.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Institute for Technology Advancement

      UCLA Institute for Technology Advancement (ITA) provides business development support and strategic direction to enable development of new multidisciplinary research. ITA provides facilities and funding to start and grow new engineering-related companies and facilitates industry access to UCLA engineering expertise. The on-going Student Entrepreneur Venture Competition is an example of a spin-out company, where ITA promotes and supports students to leverage their ideas and inventions into new companies.

      Last updated August 2, 2015

      UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs

      Luskin School of Public Affairs: The Luskin School facilities are housed on six floors of the Public Affairs Building on the UCLA campus, comprising over 50,000 square feet of instructional, research, administrative, and faculty office space. The building is conveniently located within a five minute walk from the Departments of Anthropology, Economics, Education, Geography, Psychology, Law, Sociology and Statistics and is about a 10 minute walk from the School of Public Health. The Public Affairs Building also houses entities with whom the Luskin School has developed synergistic relationships that give our affiliates unique access to a level of services unavailable to individual researchers working outside the Luskin School framework. These entities include the:

      •     California Census Research Data Center (CCRDC),

      •     California Social Science Experimental Laboratory (CASSEL),

      •     Social Sciences Computing (SSC),

      •     Social Science Data Archive (SSDA),

      •     California Center for Population Research (CCPR)

      •     Institute for Social Science Research (ISSR), an umbrella organization within the Division of Social Sciences in the UCLA College and which supports and integrates social science research.

      The Luskin School research offices house professional staff, faculty affiliates, research scientists, students and visitors. The offices serve extramurally funded research projects by providing space for collaborative and inter-disciplinary research. Students and affiliates are housed in shared research offices, research centers such as the Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies, the Center for Civil Society, the Center for Industrial, Scientific, Technological and Cultural Policy, the Institute for Transportation Studies, the Luskin Center for Innovation, and in a suite of offices for the School’s Ph.D. students. All members of the Luskin School have easy access to routine office resources, including telephones, copiers, printers and connections to the campus “backbone” computer network. 

      Last updated May 13, 2015

      UCLA Neuroscience Genomics Core (UNGC)

      The UCLA Neuroscience Genomics Core (UNGC), directed by Dr. Freimer, is committed to provide equivalent access to its members at all institutions. Additionally, the UNGC sponsors monthly scientific meetings of the user group to discuss both theoretical and practical aspects of SNP genotyping. The UNGC shared administration with the ICNN, and the ICNN Management Team coordinates operations with UNGC, and manages its computing infrastructure.

      The UNGC currently occupies approximately 1500s sq/ft of dedicated laboratory space in the Gonda research facility on the UCLA campus. Installed capital equipment includes two Illumina HiSeq_2500 sequencers, one cBot cluster station, one Illumina LIMS capable iScan confocal laser scanner with Autoloader II automatic loading support capable of scanning all Illumina beadchip formats. One Tecan Genesis 150 robotic liquid handling platform with Illumina GTS and Infinium robot control software installed, One Tecan Evo 150 robotic liquid handling platform with Illumina GTS and Infinium robot control software installed one Tecan Evo 100 robotic liquid handling platform and two 48 place temperature controlled beadchip processing racks, one SciGene Little Dipper microchip processing robot, one Tomtec autosealer, one Sequenom Massarray compact mass spec with associated nanodispener chip spotter and one MJ Research tetrad 2 thermocycling system. Additional equipment includes one Covaris M220 nucleic acid shearing system, one Covaris E210 high throughput nucleic acid shearing platform one VisonMate SR 2D barcode plate scanner, one Agilent 2200 Tapestation, one Caplier XT nucleic acid size selection system, six programmable incubation ovens, six microplate heat blocks, two tabletop Jouan centrifuges, two Molecular Dynamics fluorescent microplate readers, one speedvac and four high capacity microplate shakers and -20 and -80 freezer storage. Computer resources include ten networked workstations and one 8 core 64 bit mini tower running Mac OSX and Windows XP-64. The UNGC has 60TB of network storage space with RAID backup. All computer resources are connected through a private subnet within the larger Gonda network.

      The UNGC is equipped to provide sequencing services, including library preparation and QC, using all current Illumina and compatible third party chemistries and kits on our HiSeq-2500 instrumentation. The UNGC supports all versions of Illumina’s whole genome and custom iSelect Infinium genotyping assays, including methylation analysis and all versions of Illumina’s Gene expression chips.

      The facility is currently capable of processing over 480 million genotypes per week at full capacity and is equipped to provide sequencing services, including library preparation and QC, using all current Illumina and compatible third party chemistries and kits on Illumina HiSeq-2500 instrumentation (n= 2). Services: A)RNA purification: The Tecan Freedom Evo workstation has been configured to process RNA purification protocols using the Qiagen RNeasy plus columns in 96 well plate format. Purified RNA will be quantified using the Tecan Evo to set up RiboGreen fluorescent quantitation assays, which will then be read on the Molecular Dynamics fluorescent microplate readers. Aliquots of RNA preps will be analyzed for degradation and scored for overall quality using the Agilent Bioanalyzer service available in the MicroArray Core. B) Library construction: DNA/RNA fractionation, first and second strand cDNA synthesis (RNA), adapter ligation, library pre-aplification and size selection. C) Cluster generation and sequencing: Completed libraries will be accessioned into the UNGC sequencing production pipeline. Cluster preparation for the HiSeq_2500 pipeline takes place on dedicated cBot platform. The cBot is a stand-alone, software-controlled system for the automated generation of clonal clusters from single molecule fragments on Illumina HiSeq flow cells. The automated cBot can generate greater than 190 million clusters per channel of an eight-channel flow cell.

      The UNGC BeadLab is equipped to perform automated Illumina GoldenGate custom genotyping assays with custom snp pools (OPA’s) of 96, 394, 768, 1152 or 1536 snps. The UNGC also supports all versions of Illumina’s whole genome Infinium genotyping assay, including methylation analysis and all versions of Illumina’s Gene expression chips.

      Fine scale SNP genotyping is supported by the Sequenom 384 well MassArray system with RS1000 Nanodispenser support. This high sample capacity system adds cost effective low SNP plexity genotyping capability to the spectrum of services available through the center.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA PRIME Program

      The UCLA PRIME program is a five-year dual degree program focusing on the development of leaders in medicine that will improve the health care delivery, research, and policy in underserved communities. The program leads to an MD and a Masters in areas that complement the mission of the program. These might include MBA, MPH or MPP. This year’s cohort will be composed of approximately 18 students. Students will identify with one of two programs: PRIME UCLA-Westwood (14) or PRIME UCLA-CDU (4). A commitment to serve in, and experience working with, diverse medically disadvantaged populations is paramount. While programs coordinate with each other acceptance is to UCLA PRIME. Applicants offered secondary applications identify their preferences as to which UCLA PRIME program is of interest, UCLA-Westwood or UCLA-CDU.

      Last updated May 26, 2015

      UCLA NHLBI Proteomics Center

      With 15 years of accumulative experience and knowledge in mitochondrial biology and medicine, our NHLBI Proteomics Center at UCLA currently has the technical capacity to fully characterize >2000 proteins and metabolites in the human mitochondria, as their peptide spectra and IDs are stored in our in-house library.

      Last updated May 26, 2015

      UCLA Orphan Disease Testing Center

      The Orphan Disease Testing Center is uniquely appropriate for providing clinical confirmation of any and all putative mutations identified in subjects. Our ODTC was established 18 years ago on just this model: to offer confirmation of DNA sequence variants identified in research laboratories and to generate an official clinical report from a laboratory that is fully licensed and accredited under CLIA, CAP, and the State of California. The laboratory director, Dr. Wayne Grody, is board-certified in Clinical Molecular Genetics, Clinical Genetics, Clinical Biochemical Genetics, Anatomic and Clinical Pathology, and Molecular Genetic Pathology. He has also maintained a continuous leadership role over many years in establishing quality assurance and ethical guidelines for molecular genetic testing through numerous governmental and professional organizations that are now in practice nationwide. In this way, all of the regulatory burdens are transferred away from the research laboratory, and the DNA results can be provided legally and appropriately to physicians and patients for purposes of future medical management.

      The laboratory specializes in what is sometimes called "custom DNA sequencing", in which any mutation in any gene can readily be assessed, as long as the locus is provided by the referring research laboratory. For example, the laboratory provides validation of variants generated by the Clinical Genomics Center at UCLA that generates Whole Exome Sequencing data. In addition, the group has strong translational research interests, and were the first laboratory to be awarded NIH funding from the Office of Rare Diseases to support rapid and reliable translations of research tests to the clinical setting.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Pathology Research Portal

      Two previous research laboratories, the Clinical and Translational Research Laboratory (CTRL) and the Clinical Immunology Research Laboratory (CIRL) have been restructured into the Pathology Research Portal (PRP). This new addition to the Center for Pathology Research Services functions as the biospecimen liaison between researchers and clinical testing, and provides coordination for sample receiving, accessioning, processing, short term and long term storage, dispatching to multiple core facilities for testing, and result retrieving. PRP also provides shipping and temporary storage services, and can also provide customized services to meet various research needs.

      Last updated May 19, 2015

      UCLA School of Dentistry

      Founded in 1964, the UCLA School of Dentistry offers highly competitive programs including the D.D.S. program; M.S., Ph.D. and D.D.S./Ph.D. programs in oral biology; the Professional Program for International Dentists; continuing education courses; and postgraduate training. The school’s faculty (74 full time, 171 associated part time and 308 volunteer) are organized in six divisions including advanced prosthodontics, constitutive and regenerative sciences, diagnostic and surgical sciences, growth and development, oral biology and medicine, and public health and community dentistry. The school, which received more than $24 million in external research funding during the 2014-15 fiscal year, is home to three research centers — the Center for Oral/Head and Neck Oncology Research, the Clinical Research Center and the Weintraub Center for Reconstructive Biotechnology — and six centers of excellence in bioengineering, bone biology, cancer biology, health services, molecular microbiology and salivary diagnostics. As a fundamental part of its mission, the school serves the community through 30 clinics in the region.

      Situated on 419 acres, five miles from the Pacific Ocean, UCLA is enriched by the cultural diversity of the dynamic greater Los Angeles area, as well as the geographic advantages of Southern California. One of the world’s preeminent public research universities, UCLA is an international leader in breadth and quality of academic, research, health care, wellness, cultural, continuing education and athletic programs, with more than 4,000 faculty members who teach approximately 40,000 students in the College of Letters and Science and 11 professional schools. UCLA is consistently ranked among the top institutions nationally for research funding, having generated an average of $1 billion in research grants and contracts annually over the past five years.

      Last updated February 2, 2016

      UCLA School of Law

      UCLA School of Law, founded in 1949, is the youngest major law school in the nation and has established a tradition of innovation in its approach to teaching, research and scholarship. With approximately 100 faculty and 1,100 students, the school pioneered clinical teaching, is a leader in interdisciplinary research and training, and is at the forefront of efforts to link research to its effects on society and the legal profession. Please visit law.ucla.edu for more information.  

      Last updated May 13, 2015

      UCLA School of Nursing

      The UCLA School of Nursing is a significant force in developing nurse leaders to inspire individuals across the lifespan to achieve health, wellness, and quality of life. The School embraces diversity and is committed to attracting and supporting the best and the brightest students, faculty and staff. Innovative academic programs ensure that nurses are educated to assume leadership roles and to respond to the healthcare needs of diverse populations. The School aspires to lead the field in the use of pioneering instructional technology, clinical laboratories, and communication and evaluation systems to optimize acquisition of knowledge and skills, from basic to advanced practice.

      Last updated April 1, 2016

      UCLA School of Public Policy

      The mission of the Department of Public Policy is to enhance both the range of ideas and knowledge about how to deal with public problems and improve the skills of those who deal with them professionally, by conducting research directed to public issues, educating public policy professionals, and partnering with public servants and the community to disseminate and apply new and existing knowledge for solving public problems. The UCLA Department of Public Policy has an impressive roster of distinguished scholars representing countless disciplines. Our faculty reflects a wide range of interests in social and international issues, including crime, health, environment, welfare, and national security, to name just a few. The UCLA Department of Public Policy offers a rigorous and challenging policy program that provides the analytical tools and strategic orientation that one needs to be a leader in identifying policy problems, designing new policies and organizations, advocating their adoption, managing their implementation, and evaluating their impact. Our Master of Public Policy program combines the best of traditional policy education with a flexibility and responsiveness that enables our graduates to remain relevant and influential in a rapidly changing world.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UCLA Stroke Center

      Recognized as one of the world's leading centers for the management of cerebral vascular disease, the UCLA Stroke Center treats simple and complex vascular disorders by incorporating recent developments in emergency medicine, stroke neurology, microneurosurgery, interventional neuroradiology, stereotactic radiology, neurointensive care, neuroanesthesiology, and rehabilitation neurology. Care is coordinated from the moment of first contact, in the emergency department or outpatient clinics, through acute treatment and neurological rehabilitation. The UCLA Stroke Center provides comprehensive diagnostic and therapeutic care of patients with disorders of blood vessels of the brain and spinal cord. The CTSI will use the UCLA Stroke Center as a model for successful clinical research.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      UC-Wide President's Fellowship Program

      The University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship Program was established in 1984 to encourage outstanding women and minority Ph.D. recipients to pursue academic careers at the University of California. The current program offers postdoctoral research fellowships, professional development and faculty mentoring to outstanding scholars in all fields whose research, teaching, and service will contribute to diversity and equal opportunity at UC. The goal of the program is to provide research opportunity and career development for scholars whose work will enhance the diversity of the academic community at the University of California. Approximately 75% of UC President's Postdoctoral Fellows have received tenure track faculty appointments. Since 2003, over 100 former fellows received faculty appointments at University of California campuses.

      Last updated April 19, 2016

      Undiagnosed Disease Network

      UCLA is one of seven Clinical Sites for the Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN), awarded by the National Institute of Health, with Drs. Vilain, Nelson, Dipple and Palmer as PIs. The UDN sites conduct clinical evaluation and scientific investigation in cases that involve patients with prolonged undiagnosed conditions that have escaped extensive medical inquiries. As a UDN site, UCLA can provide for undiagnosed patients whole exome or whole genome sequencing, performed at one of two sequencing cores and interpreted by the UCLA team, state-of-the-art standardized phenotyping, and access to genotypic and phenotypic data from all sites via a mineable database. This collaborative network of researchers and healthcare providers has a stake in improving healthcare and outcomes for persons affected by various rare genetic disorders. Our approach synergizes basic and clinical research with the use of cutting-edge phenotyping technologies, an array of world class experts, and the translation of next generation sequencing to the bedside.

      Last updated April 19, 2016